Luminous Landscape Forum

The Art of Photography => The Coffee Corner => Topic started by: Rob C on September 01, 2012, 03:53:00 PM

Title: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 01, 2012, 03:53:00 PM
We used to have a thread or two listing photographers whose work we liked. Long lost in the mists of time (the threads), here's a guy who used to be in the fashion business and advertising and then went to the landscape side (almost said dark side):

http://www.chris-simpson.com

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Chris Sanderson on September 01, 2012, 05:22:52 PM
Wonderful photography - thanks for that link.
(There is a fantastic shot of a Catalina for which I have forwarded the link to a nephew of mine who is completing the restoration of one.)
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 01, 2012, 05:58:27 PM
Wonderful photography - thanks for that link.
(There is a fantastic shot of a Catalina for which I have forwarded the link to a nephew of mine who is completing the restoration of one.)


Hi Chris -

Glad to have been of some direct help!

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on September 02, 2012, 03:28:03 PM
Thanks for the link Rob!

Chris, talking about the Catalina photo, the lake, about three minutes drive from my place of residence used to house a squadron of them during the second world war and if memory serves me correctly ( it more than often doesn't) there is one still lying submerged there.

If I may add some links to South African photographers Rob:

http://stuartapseyphotography.com/gallery/
http://www.delende.com/
http://www.gregmarinovich.com/BLOG/
http://www.joaosilva.co.za/



 
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 06, 2012, 02:32:18 PM
Thanks, Riaan, there's definitely a sort of S.A. style comes through.

Here's another of my late favourites: Duffy.

http://www.duffyphotographer.com

I love this quotation, which encapsulates everything I've always said here about photography and talent:

"It is simple, if you allow it to be, there's nothing to do in photography, it just happens."

Absolutely.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 08, 2012, 03:21:41 PM
Looks to me like a recent re-do; certainly a man who knows all about stock!

If you want another old car - Pontiac - get into the "Road Trip" gallery.

http://www.ericmeola.com

Rob C


P.S. Makes me want to sell everything and take up sleeping.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 08, 2012, 04:11:58 PM
One of the very select few who actually understand colour and make it work well.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 09, 2012, 04:11:27 AM
One of the very select few who actually understand colour and make it work well.


Not to mention the fact that he made his name in the bold old world of film - probably Kodachrome/Ektachrome?... Should make today's younger folks realise that digital may well have contributed many advantages, but quailty isn't always one of them.

How I wish that stock was still viable as a means of earning one's keep, paying for all the travel etc. It would be a lifestyle in its own right. Now that I've not much else that's better to do, there's no possible way of making it pay for itself. Bugger. Bad timing. (No, I don't consider camping, living under canvas or in the back of a van a viable way of life; that would be a sentence for a crime I didn't commit!)

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 09, 2012, 05:32:30 AM
Should make today's younger folks realise that digital may well have contributed many advantages, but quailty isn't always one of them.

Rob,

As you are probably aware I am in the vanguard of those who doubt  that digital contributed anything at all other than tearing apart an industry or two and playing into the hands of the bean-counters demanding commercial expedience at the expense of all else.

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 09, 2012, 03:16:37 PM
Rob,

As you are probably aware I am in the vanguard of those who doubt  that digital contributed anything at all other than tearing apart an industry or two and playing into the hands of the bean-counters demanding commercial expedience at the expense of all else.

W




And counting!

If I can give it a plus, it's with high ASA that was out of reach with films that I knew about. I also realise that without it I'd have had to quit the expense of frequent amateur shooting - but then, I'd probably have been able to continue doing it as a pro... Anyway, the 'frequent amateur shooting' has probably given me four or so shots from hundreds - thousands? - that I've shot since getting a digital camera that strike me as worth thinking about.

Putting this whole damned electronic madness into some perspective: this past week I had my cellphone contract changed to disable Internet access - All I ever needed was a 'phone for emergencies if out of the house, and had the last two Nokias not died or had the batteries become irreplaceable, I'd probably have bought a little pocket camera instead of this smartthing. Losing Internet has cut my monthly mobile bill in half!

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: ckimmerle on September 10, 2012, 07:13:08 PM
Rob,

As you are probably aware I am in the vanguard of those who doubt  that digital contributed anything at all other than tearing apart an industry or two and playing into the hands of the bean-counters demanding commercial expedience at the expense of all else.

W

Completely assinine statement.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 10, 2012, 09:02:59 PM
Completely assinine statement.


In YOUR opinion.

If you are hoping to be part of a community - any community - a good starting point is to respect and be tolerant of the views of other members .... even if they differ from your own.  In fact, especially if they differ from your own.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 11, 2012, 04:02:37 AM
Completely assinine statement.




Ask Kodak, Ilford, Agfa, ask the photo-chemical suppliers to the industry, not to mention camera manufacturers etc. It's been far from a bloodless revolution and for what? To make it easier for non-photographers to make reasonably exposed photographs. Pace professional stock shooters et al.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Photo Op on September 11, 2012, 04:29:09 AM

 To make it easier for non-photographers to make reasonably exposed photographs.


The word "troglodyte" comes to mind. Film.....get over it!
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 11, 2012, 05:37:03 AM
Back to the original post - if we can possibly tear ourselves away from the endlessly fascinating topic of film versus digital - I reckon Chris Simpson's "artist statement" - the last few paras of the biography section on his site - is very illuminating about the distinctive quality of his wonderful photographs, which is not so common for artist statements. I also think the southern hemisphere rules, among his photographs as in so many other dimensions.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 11, 2012, 06:18:58 AM
The word "troglodyte" comes to mind. Film.....get over it!




One has little choice; it isn't the digital medium in the sense of a direct film/digital comparison that's the basic problem here, it's the fact that its advent has fucked up many many peoole's professional lives as well as entire industries in order to achieve what? In order that the world may float away on a tide of well-exposed sterility and mediocrity. Anyone can produce crap, and when it costs nothing, there's no natural brake on its production. So, the markets collapse under its flood as nobody buying pictures has the time to delve deeply enough to find the gems in the bog. Go to even the big stock sites and tell me that they, too, are not swamped with rubbish - it's become a numbers game to the ultimate degree. People no longer get into it to earn their crust: they do it for the imagined glory of, one day, making a dollar or two. And I mean one or two.

In effect, it's no longer about being good or bad, but whether you do it for money or for laughs, and the hell with those whose living you destroy; yes, there's even a new, borrowed buzzword for it: collateral damage.

Some deal.

Rob C

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on September 11, 2012, 02:34:11 PM
http://www.baileyphotos.com/

Take a look at the wildlife portfolio, African Wildlife photography at it's best.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 11, 2012, 05:52:31 PM
I reckon Chris Simpson's "artist statement" - the last few paras of the biography section on his site - is very illuminating about the distinctive quality of his wonderful photographs, which is not so common for artist statements.

Thanks for the heads-up Ken,

His whole Bio was a fascinating read but, you're right,  the guts of it was in the sting of the tail.

Cheers,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 11, 2012, 06:44:17 PM


Ask Kodak, Ilford, Agfa, ask the photo-chemical suppliers to the industry, not to mention camera manufacturers etc. It's been far from a bloodless revolution and for what? To make it easier for non-photographers to make reasonably exposed photographs. Pace professional stock shooters et al.

Rob C

Rob, transitions like this never have been bloodless. The cotton gin revolution was bloody. The horseless carriage revolution was bloody. The transition from manual to computer bookkeeping was bloody. The transition from operator-connected phones to automation was bloody. To name just a few. In every transition like these, masses of people lose their jobs, and the society has to adjust to doing things differently. But in the end, society always has been the beneficiary.

I don't agree with Walter. Everybody gets cranked up because, as you say, digital has made it easier for non-photographers to make reasonably exposed photographs. Why is that bad? Making it easier for people to make reasonably exposed photographs doesn't make them better photographers. Reasonable exposure, reasonable focus, reasonable depth of field, these things never have been the criteria for a fine photograph. The criterion has been the capture of something meaningful, something that can give the viewer a transcendental experience -- just as that's been the criterion for great music, great poetry, great painting, etc.

Yes, professional photographers have taken a big hit, just as cotton separators took a big hit, and buggy makers and livery operators took a big hit, and bookkeepers took a big hit, and telephone operators took a big hit. You should be happy you're retired. You missed the worst of the hit.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 11, 2012, 07:02:33 PM
Russ,

It goes without saying that you are welcome to disagree with me but I just want to point out that I am not so much talking about just the photographer end of things, but the broader industry-wide implications.

I don't get cranked up, I just make mention of the loss, in some areas, of some wonderful skills and crafts.

I have used digital for many years as a matter of commercial expedience - survival, if you like.  It works.  In fact, at times it works too well.  But it denies me the joy of working in the ruby glow of a safelight with the sound of running water.  What that has meant is that there is now a greater divide between my commercial exploits and my recreational photographic exploits.  It isn't a problem and what I expressed was not a problem - but merely an observation.

Cheers,

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: ckimmerle on September 11, 2012, 08:24:37 PM
In YOUR opinion.

If you are hoping to be part of a community - any community - a good starting point is to respect and be tolerant of the views of other members .... even if they differ from your own.  In fact, especially if they differ from your own.



I have lost patience with people like you and Rob who lament the quasi-demise of film to the point where you make illogical and overly emotional statements. Digital is here, both as an art and as an industry, and if you don't like it then do something else. Nobody is forcing you to take pictures. Paint, write, watch TV, but for crying out loud stop whining about digital.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 11, 2012, 09:07:22 PM
Russ,

It goes without saying that you are welcome to disagree with me but I just want to point out that I am not so much talking about just the photographer end of things, but the broader industry-wide implications.

Walter,

We seem to agree a lot more often than we disagree, but this is one time we don't agree. I loved doing darkroom work too, except for cleaning up at the end of the session, and I miss even simple things like loading cassettes from bulk film, and bringing a 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 roll of Ektachrome out of the tank and looking closely at the soft, understated, fantastic color (which would then fade to nothing within a very few years).

I'm sorry to see Kodak go under. It was a great outfit, and with its "You push the button, we do the rest" it started the move toward where we are today. I'm sure there were plenty of successful pictorialists who were just as cranked about that stab-in-the-back as today's film photographers are about digital. Kodak even invented digital photography, then turned its back, or at least its side, on it. Kodak's demise is a major part of the industry-wide implications you've mentioned, but in Kodak's case, and in the case of several other outfits, the demise resembles suicide more than it resembles murder.

I miss the darkroom and many other peculiarities of film, but I'd never go back to film. Digital is a huge step forward.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 12, 2012, 12:30:31 AM
I have lost patience with people like you and Rob

Sir,

If YOU have lost patience it is YOUR problem.  Perhaps it would not be out of place to seek professional counseling and possible treatment.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: jeremypayne on September 12, 2012, 01:26:20 AM
I have lost patience with people like you and Rob who lament the quasi-demise of film to the point where you make illogical and overly emotional statements. Digital is here, both as an art and as an industry, and if you don't like it then do something else. Nobody is forcing you to take pictures. Paint, write, watch TV, but for crying out loud stop whining about digital.

+1

Chuck is definitely NOT the problem.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 12, 2012, 05:48:13 AM
Thanks for chiming in Mr Eponymous,

Frankly, I fail to see what there is to be a problem.  I just looked back through all 295 of my posts and the ONLY TWO that relate in any way to a Film / Digital discussion are in this very thread.  Not a great volume to lose the patience over.  And, to those able to comprehend my statements they were no so much a lament as an observation.

Hooroo,

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: jeremypayne on September 12, 2012, 06:25:50 AM
Thanks for chiming in Mr Eponymous,

Your attempt to be the champion of community standards didn't last very long, eh?
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on September 12, 2012, 08:10:36 AM
Here's something on-topic for a change:

http://www.siegfried-hansen.de/ (http://www.siegfried-hansen.de/)

Street photographer from Germany. Shoots mainly jpgs with a Fuji X100, if I remember correctly.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 12, 2012, 08:29:21 AM
Street photographer from Germany. Shoots mainly jpgs with a Fuji X100, if I remember correctly.

How rewarding to see such fine and innovative work.  Thank you for sharing the link.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 12, 2012, 09:33:57 AM
Your attempt to be the champion of community standards didn't last very long, eh?

You generally reap that which you sow. You got yours, dear Jeremy. Rest peacefully.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Slobodan Blagojevic on September 12, 2012, 10:50:48 AM
... Street photographer from Germany...

Now, that's a street photography I get!
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 12, 2012, 12:01:16 PM
Street photographer from Germany. Shoots mainly jpgs with a Fuji X100, if I remember correctly.

Some fantastic stuff in there, Fips. Hansen understands the difference between documentary photography and street photography. Thanks for the link.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: colinb on September 12, 2012, 12:19:32 PM
Hi Russ. I agree that these are good photos. I like them a lot. I don't understand the difference between street and documentary photography. Please teach me.

c
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 12, 2012, 12:50:35 PM
Hi Colin, You're not alone. The only way really to learn the difference is to spend a lot of time looking at the work of the great street photographers. Some of the greats are included in the annotated bibliography I've posted at http://www.russ-lewis.com/Bib/Bib.html. People in that list to concentrate on are: Andre Kertesz, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Doisneau, Willy Ronis, Brassai, Walker Evans, Elliott Erwitt, Marc Riboud, Helen Levitt, Robert Frank, Garry Winogrand, Lee Friedlander, and Vivian Maier, with special emphasis on Cartier-Bresson and Frank.

There also are two articles on the subject at:

http://www.externalconnections.info/Articles/OnStreetPhotography.html

and

http://www.externalconnections.info/Articles/WhyDoStreetPhotography.html

I wrote those articles last year and finally gave up trying to finding a publisher.

In my own estimation, street photography has fallen on hard times since the demise of photojournalism magazines like Life and Look, but it's still out there, and there still are people doing it well. Obviously, Siegfried Hanson is one of them.


Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on September 12, 2012, 03:34:47 PM
Hi Russ, thanks for the link to your essay. You write "A good street photograph is a story, though the story may be confusing or even one you'll never be able to decipher". I would like a add another opinion, which is from the other end of the spectrum. Garry Winogrand said "I think there isn't a photograph in the word that has a narrative ability". His reasoning is that "all a photograph ever does is to describe light on surface. That's all there is".

IMHO that's exactly where the difference between documentary and street photography lies. The latter doesn't have any intentions to show more than what the subject looks like.
Documentary photography by itself, i.e. without accompanying words, doesn't exist in my opinion. Simply for the fact that a story lies at the heart of a documentary which doesn't exists in a photograph by itself.

Here's a very nice video, albeit awful quality, where Winogrand talks about his ideas: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQhZcKzbM9s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQhZcKzbM9s)
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 12, 2012, 03:35:35 PM
Now, that's a street photography I get!

+1 Slobodan,

Fresh, structured and not doffing the cap to long-dead practitioners and their fruits.

Regards,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 12, 2012, 04:05:13 PM
Hi Fips,

Yes, I've seen that clip before, and it's a good one, even though the quality leaves something to be desired.

Well, Garry's right. But I can say the same thing about the Mona Lisa. It's just light reflected off paint on a surface. I also agree with you that documentary photography isn't documentary unless it's accompanied by words -- at least I'd agree that photojournalism isn't anything without journalism. On the other hand, I'd never agree with Garry or anybody else that no photograph has narrative ability. Maybe I only see the narrative here because I was there, but I don't think that's the reason.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 12, 2012, 08:27:50 PM
On the other hand, I'd never agree with Garry or anybody else that no photograph has narrative ability. Maybe I only see the narrative here because I was there, but I don't think that's the reason.

The "narrative ability" is in the mind of the viewer (and also of the artist, although that is another story).

The mind looks for stories, in the world around it and in images whether they be paintings, drawings or photographs. This probably starts with sociobiology - there is obvious survival value in detecting stories which include threats or possible advantages. But then nurture and culture take over - we know that images sometimes tell stories so we look for them and we have available a rich repertoire of possible stories, whether they be religious as in much of western painting, sexual as in a some street photography, or in a broad sense political, as (to my mind) in Russ's fine image.

Of course the mind doesn't always find much of a story and that isn't necessarily a problem. The mind also looks for formal elements (beauty, if you like). There may also be a sociobiological context for that, to do with sexual selection, although I find such arguments a bit thin, and nurture and culture are certainly in play. I find mostly formal qualities in Siegfried Hansen's fine work, although there is an underlying story about the urban environment, and the lovely visual pun in the homepage image is a kind of story. I would argue that there is always a kind of story in the experienced image because the mind is so assiduous in looking for one. The ghosts of landscape which many people perceive in abstract painting are cases in point. And sometimes the story is the absence of story.

I am stretching the definition of "story" in this line of argument but I would argue that it is a legitimate stretch. For example, current thinking about landscape has it that there is an underlying "story" in all images of landscape, whether it be about wilderness, or gardens, or the inside and the outside, or danger, or power, or the human and the non-human. Stories don't have to have a lot of detail. Maybe "content" is a better word.

What I have said about the mind of the viewer applies, mutatis mutandis, to the mind of the artist.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 12, 2012, 08:56:38 PM
Wow! And here I always thought you looked at a picture and either got something from it or not. I had no idea there was so much sociobiological significance involved. And nurture and culture too. . . Damn! It's clear I'll have to go back to school and learn all this stuff before I can continue shooting on the street.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 12, 2012, 09:20:39 PM
Damn! It's clear I'll have to go back to school and learn all this stuff before I can continue shooting on the street.
Oh please. I thought we were having an intelligent conversation here - and one in which I expressed agreement with your viewpoint and admiration for your photograph. Do you really believe that the fact that you happen never to have thought something means that it isn't worth thinking or expressing?
In retrospect, a bit of a hissy fit. Withdrawn.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 13, 2012, 01:01:04 AM
Thanks for expressing your view Ken,

Story? Narrative? Nature or nurture? Call it what we will, without it could the motion picture have survived and flourished?

Cheers,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 13, 2012, 11:47:42 AM
. . . and admiration for your photograph.
 

Gosh, and here I thought your admiration for the photograph was because of its narrative value.

I'm pulling your chain, Ken. When it comes to a choice between thinking and feeling I usually opt for thinking, which probably is why I was successful as a military officer and, later, as a software engineer. But to me, art, which includes photography, has to do with feeling, not thinking. I don't analyze images and I always balk, and often laugh, at attempts to analyze them. I usually roll on the floor laughing when I read the "artists' statements" hung next to the atrocities I see in our local museum.

All of which is why I enjoy street photography. A really effective street photograph defies any sort of analysis. It either grabs you or it doesn't. The grabbing may have something to do with sociobiology or nurture, and it almost certainly has something to do with culture, but to try to analyze a photograph or its viewer's reaction on those bases seems to me futile in the extreme, and probably self-referential.

When I see I've made a decent street photograph I usually can look back and realize that I didn't know why I was making the shot. It was a gut reaction, not a thought process. Thinking tends to be destructive when it comes to art.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on September 13, 2012, 12:03:52 PM
Quote
On the other hand, I'd never agree with Garry or anybody else that no photograph has narrative ability. Maybe I only see the narrative here because I was there, but I don't think that's the reason.

That's the point I guess. The story is only what your mind makes up. That is unless you you were present when the photo was made, then you actually know the story. I for one can't tell from this very nice picture you posted what was going on. But I certainly enjoy looking at it.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 13, 2012, 12:17:12 PM
Okay, Fips, but tell me "what your mind makes up."
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on September 13, 2012, 12:41:38 PM
You are referring to the photograph you posted? Ok, I'll give it a try: I see some American air force personnel in Asia. Probably Korea as 1953 marked the end of the Korean War, if I remember correctly (although the Kanji painted on the crate could suggest otherwise). So I could imagine that these guys are heading home which would also explain the pleased look of the gentleman on the right.
So what about the boy? I don't know. Is he looking at the officer? He might be looking to something on his right side out of this frame. Is he begging? Or was he given something? Is the man ignoring him oder didn't he even notice the boy because he is listening to somebody on the left? I don't know.

I guess I was able to extract some information out of this image but something like a story? Personally, I wouldn't say so.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 13, 2012, 12:49:56 PM
Probably Korea as 1953 marked the end of the Korean War, if I remember correctly

The copyright notice would re-inforce your appraisal Fips.

I find it a very anti-US of A image and elements of it are almost a parody.  Other elements are quite hateful.

Cheers,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on September 13, 2012, 01:28:17 PM
Even without the date I would have guessed that it's from the time of the Korean war. I didn't see anything "anti US of A" which is because I'm from Europe and too young to have many memories from the cold war times. However, now from your answer, I see your point.
But this sort of proofs Garry's theory: A photograph is describes light on surface. We can't even agree on the aesthetics, let's alone a "story".

BTW, I really enjoy the discussions on this forum. Doesn't happen too often in the wild internets that you can talk in a halfway civilized manner about controversial subjects.

Philipp
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 13, 2012, 04:03:36 PM
You are referring to the photograph you posted? Ok, I'll give it a try: I see some American air force personnel in Asia. Probably Korea as 1953 marked the end of the Korean War, if I remember correctly (although the Kanji painted on the crate could suggest otherwise). So I could imagine that these guys are heading home which would also explain the pleased look of the gentleman on the right.
So what about the boy? I don't know. Is he looking at the officer? He might be looking to something on his right side out of this frame. Is he begging? Or was he given something? Is the man ignoring him oder didn't he even notice the boy because he is listening to somebody on the left? I don't know.

I guess I was able to extract some information out of this image but something like a story? Personally, I wouldn't say so.

Okay, so the fact that the kid's wearing cast-off, ripped-off pants, that he's covered with mud, and that he's holding out his hand doesn't tell you anything. He's just another kid like the kid down the street. I'd have to guess you've never been out of Europe, Fips, and certainly not to a country where people are in dire straits. By the way, the fact that the kid's not looking at the major is one thing, but the fact that the major's obviously, deliberately, ignoring the kid directly in front of him might lead you to another question.

But as I said, ones response to a picture certainly has something to do with the viewer's culture.

And Walter, I don't know where you've been or where you are, but your appraisal is far off the mark and makes it clear you've been influenced heavily by the "oh how bad we are in the U.S." culture of the left.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on September 13, 2012, 04:39:03 PM
You're wrong. I've worked in south east asia working with locals for a while during my time at university. And certainly, I didn't spend all the time in fancy hotels for rich Europeans.

Of course I am aware that the boy is probably begging and the major is ignoring him. But I don't know that from looking at the picture! There is no possible way anyone could extract this information out of this image, irrespective of whether one knows this place and its people or not.
The major could already have given the boy some money, food or whatever. They might just play a game. Even if he's begging doesn't mean that his family is starving and not taking care. There are millions of possibilities.

And no, this has nothing to do with being arrogant, ignorant, and ignoring a sad truth. I can find your image pleasing from a photographers point of view, I can accept that I don't know what's happening in it, and at the same time think about the reality that surrounds the image if you will.

In fact, we as photographers should be the ones who know the best, that the reality isn't always what a photograph suggests. And that's especially the case in times of war.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 13, 2012, 05:12:21 PM
When it comes to a choice between thinking and feeling I usually opt for thinking

Hi Russ

Our natural approaches are very different. Clearly for you it does come to a choice, often or always, when you are attending to works of art and maybe otherwise. For me it doesn't. I think and feel at the same time or in sequence and I find them mutually supportive. The feeling enriches the thought, the thought refines and informs the feeling. At the moment I am doing some reading in preparation for a visit to an exhibition of Spanish paintings from the Prado at the Brisbane museum. The paintings are rich in feeling about such things as religious devotion, the horror of war, human cruelty, madness, the beauty of women and nature. If previous experience is any guide, my reading, and thinking, about the historical context won't stand in the way of my being powerfully moved by the paintings. No more than thinking about why we are interested in stories makes me any less interested in stories.

To reciprocate the chain-pulling,  I think you have set up a false antithesis that may tell us something about your own psychology but provides a poor guide to art appreciation.

As I am sure you appreciate, I certainly wasn't withdrawing my liking for your photograph.

cheers

Ken
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 13, 2012, 06:13:28 PM
Hi Ken and Fips, Here's the story:

Walter to the contrary notwithstanding, there's nothing anti-US or hateful about this picture. Yes, it's 1953, and if I remember correctly the war was still going on when I shot the picture, but very close to ending. For those who don't know the history: When the separation between north and south Korea came there was a huge migration from the north to the south; and since the Koreans are intelligent people, virtually no migration from the south to the communist north. Unfortunately there was no established place for the refugees to go, so most of them ended up living in the kinds of shacks you see in this picture of the refugees under the bridge over the river that runs along the north edge of Taegu (Daegu). When the war came, the U.S. and allies spent a huge amount of blood and treasure to keep the south Koreans free. The south Koreans weren't anti-US, and there was nothing hateful about what the U.S. did. Quite the contrary. The result, of course, is history.

I made this picture at a military bus stop in downtown Taegu. Obviously, the kid's begging. You'd have to have led a pretty sheltered life not to understand that. And the kid's pathetic. I don't know how bad off he was. It's likely he was as bad off as he appears to be -- look at his ribs -- but it's also possible his folks dressed him up that way to make him a more effective beggar. In any case I can tell you from experience that the major was ignoring the kid because if he'd given him anything there'd instantly have been at least 50 more kids dancing around him and tugging at him.

If I considered the pictureof the kid at the bus stop street photography I'd never have explained anything about it, but it's more photojournalism than anything else. It's missing the kind of ambiguity that's one of the differences between a documentary photograph and a street photograph. Since it's photojournalism, as I said earlier, it needs to have some journalism go with it.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 13, 2012, 06:40:20 PM
When it comes to a choice between thinking and feeling I usually opt for thinking,

I don't doubt you at all in that statement Russ,

In my eyes your work reflects that sentiment consistently — quite possibly to its detriment — and the Korean pic illustrates that you have done it for a very long time.

And Walter, I don't know where you've been or where you are, but your appraisal is far off the mark and makes it clear you've been influenced heavily by the "oh how bad we are in the U.S." culture of the left.

Getting defensive of your work may cause you to look to outside influences and even bring politics into the equation Russ, but my opinion is formed totally by the evidence presented within the image.

The pig-skin briefcase is a starting point - as early as the 70s the pig-skin briefcase was a part of the parody of attempts to dislodge Idi Amin.  The picture illustrates the vast chasm of disparity between the 'haves' and the 'have-nots' and goes on to highlight the disinterest of the 'haves' with the plight of the 'have-nots' by the stoic stance and expression of the principal geezer.

Pictures DO contain narrative and do convey messages whether you want to think they do or not.

One of the people you continually make reference to in your advocacy of 'Street' is Walker Evans — a guy very fond to my own heart and whom I have studied considerably.  Thinking and narrative were primary motivations of his when he chose to give up literature and pursue photography.  He had been immensely influenced by the rich descriptive style of Baudelaire and Flaubert and wanted to incorporate it into his pictures.  It was his huge skill at achieving that which paved his way to prominence.

Nobody working with a view-camera can dispense with thinking in favour of gut reactions.  Not Evans, not Adams and not me.  In fact, I have long considered that the 35mm camera is reactive and the ground-glass camera is contemplative and meditative.  So yes, in 35mm there can be gut reaction (doesn't have to be, though) and, as a rule, the larger camera is not sufficiently facile to allow it (although the guy who shot the Hindenburg explosion didn't make a bad show of it with 6 sheets in 22 seconds.

Now, after all this digression from the original intent of this thread with the addition of photos in place of links to other photographers, may I attempt to make amends by posting this link:

http://www.amazon.com/Walker-Evans-Photographs-Lincoln-Kirstein/dp/0810960303

Cheers,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 13, 2012, 07:33:40 PM
It's missing the kind of ambiguity that's one of the differences between a documentary photograph and a street photograph.
Now you're thinking ;). An excellent point, which I am hoping will be amplified in your essays, which I will now read.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 13, 2012, 08:20:51 PM
...ambiguity...

A few further thoughts:

Does the difference between Walter's reading of the shot and yours, Russ, suggest that the image does have a kind of ambiguity?

Does your disagreement with Walter's (left wing, anti-american and so on) reading indicate that you believe he needs to do a bit more thinking in order to properly appreciate your image?

Does that difference also support my original argument that the story is the product of what is in the mind of the viewer and what is in the image?

cheers

Ken
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on September 14, 2012, 03:51:18 AM
Does that difference also support my original argument that the story is the product of what is in the mind of the viewer and what is in the image?

That's exactly the point. The story is not told by the image but by the viewer himself. Therefore, without a written or spoken explanation a picture by itself cannot be journalism. Even if the image is as strong as yours Russ.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 14, 2012, 05:54:32 AM
This makes me think of the current row and attacks and deaths due to the crazy posting of inflammatory video clips...

We should all stick with the ladies and/or cars. But wait! That, too, can be inflammatory and bring down a hail of death.

You can't win.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on September 14, 2012, 07:40:48 AM
We should all stick with the ladies and/or cars.

Yeah, Michael should just shift focus and rename this site to Luminous Ladies. Sounds good to me  :D
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 14, 2012, 10:24:45 AM
Yeah, Michael should just shift focus and rename this site to Luminous Ladies. Sounds good to me  :D


And get this: it could still exist as LuLa!

I'm all for that sort of modern improvement.... no Luddite when it comes to important things.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on September 14, 2012, 10:36:47 AM
Right. And all the luddites can toddle off to LuLu. Luminous Luddites.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 14, 2012, 11:32:26 AM
And Walter, I don't know where you've been or where you are, but your appraisal is far off the mark and makes it clear you've been influenced heavily by the "oh how bad we are in the U.S." culture of the left.

Getting defensive of your work may cause you to look to outside influences and even bring politics into the equation Russ, but my opinion is formed totally by the evidence presented within the image.

Sorry Walter, but it was your statement, and it was a statement nobody in the U.S. on either side of the political fence in the fifties or early sixties would have made or even thought. It wasn't until the late sixties and early seventies that this kind of sentiment began to raise its head, and it's only been in the last decade or so that it's become a standard sentiment among a large class of people.

Quote
The pig-skin briefcase is a starting point - as early as the 70s the pig-skin briefcase was a part of the parody of attempts to dislodge Idi Amin.  The picture illustrates the vast chasm of disparity between the 'haves' and the 'have-nots' and goes on to highlight the disinterest of the 'haves' with the plight of the 'have-nots' by the stoic stance and expression of the principal geezer.

You're right about what was happening in the 70's, but in the fifties and early sixties this wasn't the case at all. ". . . vast chasm of disparity between the 'haves' and the 'have-nots'?" I can guarantee that this major, obviously a REMF, bought that briefcase right there in Taegu from a vendor in an open-front shop. I also can guarantee that the briefcase had a peculiar odor because it was tanned in (mostly human) urine. The reason I know that is because I had a similar camera case. The leather was beautiful, but. . .

Quote
Pictures DO contain narrative and do convey messages whether you want to think they do or not.

A quote, from reply #35 by RSL: ". . . I'd agree that photojournalism isn't anything without journalism. On the other hand, I'd never agree with Garry or anybody else that no photograph has narrative ability."

Quote
One of the people you continually make reference to in your advocacy of 'Street' is Walker Evans — a guy very fond to my own heart and whom I have studied considerably.  Thinking and narrative were primary motivations of his when he chose to give up literature and pursue photography.  He had been immensely influenced by the rich descriptive style of Baudelaire and Flaubert and wanted to incorporate it into his pictures.  It was his huge skill at achieving that which paved his way to prominence.

Nobody working with a view-camera can dispense with thinking in favour of gut reactions.  Not Evans, not Adams and not me.  In fact, I have long considered that the 35mm camera is reactive and the ground-glass camera is contemplative and meditative.  So yes, in 35mm there can be gut reaction (doesn't have to be, though) and, as a rule, the larger camera is not sufficiently facile to allow it (although the guy who shot the Hindenburg explosion didn't make a bad show of it with 6 sheets in 22 seconds.

Now, after all this digression from the original intent of this thread with the addition of photos in place of links to other photographers, may I attempt to make amends by posting this link:

http://www.amazon.com/Walker-Evans-Photographs-Lincoln-Kirstein/dp/0810960303

Cheers,

W

Now you're talking about the guy who's been my favorite photographer since I first ran across him, I think in the late fifties or early sixties. Walker's FSA photographs, and his photographs in Let Us Now Praise Famous Men are thinking photographs, and most of them were made with a view camera. And yes, I did a bunch of work with a view camera after I read Ansel Adams's books and, for a year or two, tried to do Ansel's kind of work. But its contemplative nature never grabbed me the same way the flexibility and instant response of the small camera grabbed me. Walker did his street photography with at least a Graflex and often with 35mm. These were less thinking photographs and more feeling photographs.

And, as I pointed out in my online annotated bibliography, I have at least 8 books in my library by or about Walker, and American Photographs is one of them. I've studied Walker and his work for decades.

Okay, Walter, here's the hatchet. Let's bury it.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 14, 2012, 11:59:11 AM
Does the difference between Walter's reading of the shot and yours, Russ, suggest that the image does have a kind of ambiguity?

No, it means, principally, that Walter and I have a different knowledge and understanding of the Korean war, and that we've been shaped differently by our cultures. My knowledge of the Korean war is based mostly on having been in it. Since Walter hasn't told us where he is or how old he is, I have to guess, but I'd guess Walter's knowledge of the Korean war is based on his reading, and those who write history write it based on their cultural biases. There's nothing inherently ambiguous about the image. That's why I don't call it street photography, and why I'm willing to add some journalism to the photojournalistic picture.

Quote
Does your disagreement with Walter's (left wing, anti-american and so on) reading indicate that you believe he needs to do a bit more thinking in order to properly appreciate your image?

No, I think Walter's reading is based on what he's been taught. Your thinking is based on what you've been taught, and "increasing" your thinking can't cause your thinking to break out of that corral. Walter's made clear that he "appreciates" that image.

Quote
Does that difference also support my original argument that the story is the product of what is in the mind of the viewer and what is in the image?

I'm not sure what you mean by that, Ken. Certainly what a person deduces (thought process) from an image depends on his cultural background. But what he feels, in other words the unconscious impact of a photograph may not depend at all on his cultural background. It may depend only on his humanity. What comes to mind is pictures of the execution grounds in the book Imperial China Photographs 1850-1912. Anybody who's actually human is going to respond to those pictures of people lined up to be killed, and bodies lying on the ground, in the same way. This kind of response, by the way, is the heart of street photography's effectiveness.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 14, 2012, 06:33:41 PM
Russ,

You don't get off the hook as easily as presenting a hatchet and suggesting that matters be buried as your last word.

My comments about the snap you posted are based entirely on the data as presented in the photograph.  The provenance and aroma of the briefcase have no bearing on the matter.  The featured player's demeanour and comments you have made in your posts regarding the local peasantry and their methods say plenty.

As does the fact that this picture (and the ensuing discussion) miss the mark of relevance to this thread by a county or two.

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 14, 2012, 07:02:11 PM
"increasing" your thinking can't cause your thinking to break out of that corral
Yes it can. I not infrequently change my mind based on further reading and thinking and on almost every subject that comes to mind, I have moved beyond anything I was ever taught. YMMV but actually, I don't believe it does.


I'm not sure what you mean by that, Ken. Certainly what a person deduces (thought process) from an image depends on his cultural background.
"Depends" is the wrong word. Shaped, influenced, to a greater or lesser degree is what I would say.

But what he feels, in other words the unconscious impact of a photograph may not depend at all on his cultural background. It may depend only on his humanity. What comes to mind is pictures of the execution grounds in the book Imperial China Photographs 1850-1912. Anybody who's actually human is going to respond to those pictures of people lined up to be killed, and bodies lying on the ground, in the same way. This kind of response, by the way, is the heart of street photography's effectiveness.
That is a powerful example, but also a bit of a special case and it doesn't do the job you are asking it to in your line of argument. I don't know the photographs you refer to but I imagine they might cover similar ground to Goya's etchings of the Peninsular War - eg this (http://www.google.com.au/imgres?hl=en&sa=X&rlz=1C1CHFX_enUS491US491&biw=1600&bih=813&tbs=isz:l&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&tbnid=CZUkQ13QbLEdtM:&imgrefurl=http://garyarseneau.blogspot.com/2012/06/goya-forgeries-in-university-of.html&docid=anqqOLFffgkOFM&imgurl=http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-6oVfGlz7F00/T-SBIh6gptI/AAAAAAAACnE/05ZQFo0zTt4/s1600/Goya_1985.11.2(2).jpg&w=1500&h=1136&ei=87RTUJi7N4STiQfLtIGYAg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=1006&vpy=179&dur=3744&hovh=195&hovw=258&tx=128&ty=97&sig=112741541009062295367&page=1&tbnh=126&tbnw=166&start=0&ndsp=32&ved=1t:429,r:5,s:0,i:89). Such images certainly have universal impact based on humanity, but even there the impact can be enriched and nuanced by knowledge of what is going on, the artist's other work and so on. And there are other images we can't make much of at all (emotionally or conceptually) without cultural knowledge.

To fully appreciate the cultural apparatus necessary to respond to photographs or other images, it is helpful to do the thought experiment involving a lost amazonian tribe never in contact with world culture. Hand one of them even the most "universally" appealing of street photographs and they will initially see a rectangular two-dimensional object with marks on it. After a while, they might learn to read the image. A lot of what I mean by culture goes under our radar - we take it for granted and assume it is universal.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 15, 2012, 04:25:45 AM
For God's sake!

I kicked this thread off with one simple, honest ambition: to provide a single, concentrated source (yet again!) where we could post links to snappers whose work we enjoy in the hope that it may provide other readers with similar experiences and pleasures.

If it's just going to become another forum for the splitting of semantic hairs, then I'm done with the whole damned thing.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RSL on September 15, 2012, 11:39:27 AM
You're right, Rob, but how often does this not happen when a thread is as general as Links to Photographers?

My apologies to you and the others who might have been enlightened by the links. I should have known better than to get into an extended discussion with academics who believe naming something is the same thing as understanding it.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 15, 2012, 11:04:12 PM
You're right, Rob, but how often does this not happen when a thread is as general as Links to Photographers?

My apologies to you and the others who might have been enlightened by the links. I should have known better than to get into an extended discussion with academics who believe naming something is the same thing as understanding it.
Give me a break, Rob. In your many (and almost always interesting) posts you have frequently moved threads in directions totally unconnected with their starting points. And this one has included several more links to interesting images, including from me.

And come off it, Russ. I am not an academic and I don't believe that naming something is the same thing as understanding it. Nothing I have written provides any warrant for either of those ad hominem assertions. I have simply presumed to argue a different line to yours on a topic which someone else introduced. Further discussion is clearly futile but couldn't we end it without a cheap shot?
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 15, 2012, 11:11:42 PM
And here (http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/13/a-long-view-of-wars-in-afghanistan/) is some photojournalism I found interesting this morning.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on September 16, 2012, 02:33:20 PM
And here (http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/13/a-long-view-of-wars-in-afghanistan/) is some photojournalism I found interesting this morning.

Thanks Ken.
 

One of my all time favourites:

http://life.time.com/history/vietnam-war-one-ride-with-yankee-papa-13/
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on September 19, 2012, 04:55:19 PM
Here's a chap who never fails to impress me:

http://danwintersphoto.com/

He's multi-faceted in his crafts too.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 20, 2012, 03:51:53 AM
Here's a chap who never fails to impress me:

http://danwintersphoto.com/

He's multi-faceted in his crafts too.




Thanks, Walter.

Two things I observe: his simple portrait style is what I imagine I'll get from my new terrace 'studio' space; I hate the system of moving thumbnails - I fight hard to keep up with the distracting motion as well as linger long enough to absorb what I'm seeing.

There's probably a way to switch off, but it's yet to be discovered (by me); everything either drifts to the right or to the left. I have to rush off and lie down and stick in the eye-drops so shall watch the rest of his site this evening.

Thanks for posting - seems to be a good set of images in store for later!

Rob
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on September 20, 2012, 03:48:06 PM

Thanks, Walter.

Two things I observe: his simple portrait style is what I imagine I'll get from my new terrace 'studio' space; I hate the system of moving thumbnails - I fight hard to keep up with the distracting motion as well as linger long enough to absorb what I'm seeing.
Rob

Have you started using "the studio" Rob?

Herewith another link to a South African photographer, his work "Enter Exit" I found quite interesting.
 
http://www.pierrec.com/
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 21, 2012, 03:26:19 PM

Have you started using "the studio" Rob?

Herewith another link to a South African photographer, his work "Enter Exit" I found quite interesting.
 
http://www.pierrec.com/



Thanks, Riann, I've now put it on 'favourites' for later on - too much sitting at a hard swivel chair for tonight - the couch and BBC TV call!

Nope, no use of the 'studio' yet - the painters have finally moved onto my building and will soon be working on the terrace - should boost the bounce illumination a stop or so! Irons in the fire with a couple of ladies - not stars but possible subjects, but going on past local experience, it never comes to anything in the end: they chicken out. Bloody little islands!

Islands can be nice, but they hold you as much prisoner as they give you security. It would be nice just to jump into the car and have Europe at your feet; to do that, you need to buy expensive ferry tickets and book your return... if you want Open ticketing, that's even more expensive; throw in about a hundred quid a day for small hotel and food, and a week runs away with a grand. I'd rather keep it, in the circumstances. It was of so different a thought process when thinking couples! In all ways.

;-)

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Fips on October 05, 2012, 03:48:26 AM
Following the discussion by Walter, Russ et al. about the in- and exclusion of man-made objects in landscapes, I thought it would be interesting to show one extreme example of inclusion. I really admire the cityscape series by Beate Guetschow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beate_G%C3%BCtschow). She composes vast urban landscapes which look devastated and abandoned yet people are casually but sparsely present. The images are printed in B/W in very large formats. They really manage to make you feel queasy for no apparent reason.
Unfortunately, there seem to be no high resolution images on the web, but have a look here (http://seizingthelight.wordpress.com/2010/03/27/beate-gutschow/) and
here (http://www.sonnabendgallery.com/index.php?v=artist&id=8&col=2).

(be warned though, it's art with all it's implications: limited edition, expensive prints, and lots of interpretation mumbo-jumbo  ;) )
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on October 05, 2012, 05:42:08 AM
Thank you, Fips, for posting the link.

I didn't read the blurb - I now seldom do read these because I prefer to view things without pevious conditioning/softening up of myself - and so on to the pictures: I actually like the b/white ones but not the colour ones at all; I think that they (b/w) are good examples of the genre (and it most certainly is a genre and far from unique) and I enjoy looking at them on the monitor, as I would, too, in a well-printed book which I would not buy, but would, nonetheless, enjoy.

I'm sure there would also be commercial outlets for that kind of material, apart from the art segment, that is.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on October 10, 2012, 03:07:50 PM
I think this is a new link within the Duffy website. Well worth the reading.

http://www.duffyphotographer.com/pdf/People_Photo_Duffy.pdf

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on October 10, 2012, 05:17:08 PM
Thanks for the heads-up Rob,

Always a reassurance and pleasure that there was a time when things happened so well.

I think a lot of the interest in Duffy is a result of his son's involvement in what survives of his archive.  Bailey, of course, is a master of his own PR.  But what a shame so little is seen or heard in the present era of Terence Donovan.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on October 11, 2012, 02:59:48 AM
I think this is a new link within the Duffy website. Well worth the reading.

http://www.duffyphotographer.com/pdf/People_Photo_Duffy.pdf

Rob C

Thanks Rob, I'll have a read tonight.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on October 11, 2012, 04:44:55 AM
Thanks for the heads-up Rob,

Always a reassurance and pleasure that there was a time when things happened so well.

I think a lot of the interest in Duffy is a result of his son's involvement in what survives of his archive.  Bailey, of course, is a master of his own PR.  But what a shame so little is seen or heard in the present era of Terence Donovan.


That's right; he was possibly even more successful in financial terms because he did a lot of commercials early on (this is only from reading - never met him) and even had a foray into movies. Perhaps the most general public publicity he had was when he topped himself, as also happened with Bob C-C who managed to do some books; he (Bob) had a long interview in the BJP about the huge difficulties he faced with his last book attempt, and I think it never flew.

The thing that really clicked with me on the latest link I posted (Duffy) is that he felt it was all going south as early as the late 70s; that’s very interesting for me, because it was the 70s (early) when I realised – via harsh reality – that much of the Scottish fashion business was sliding into oblivion or being serviced – more cheaply! – down in London! That’s what pushed me to try calendars, which saved the business from extinction and opened the door to stock.

Several younger posters here have argued that this is still a ‘golden age’ for photography; Cooter has also pointed to the fact that budgets are lower and you have to do more for the same return. In my own experience, the slide is very real and not simply a matter of the keeper calling time on the hire of my particular little rowing boat.  Because some are still working doesn’t mean that the business hasn’t deteriorated; it only means that some are doing what’s currently still left to be done. Okay, digital had a huge accelerative effect on things, and the reports of excellent London processing labs closing their doors filled the BJP; camera firms collapsed with the times; but beyond that tragedy of lost jobs, photography also lost its mystique: there really was a time when being a fashion or calendar snapper gave you a cache that being an accountant or surgeon did not. I enjoyed all that. Do as many have it today, I wonder?

But perhaps it’s the same with music now; electronic dissemination has taken the place of hard copies and the tactile and visual buzz of a beautiful piece of LP art will probably never be experienced again.  Prided myself with my LP collection, keeping the things in plastic sleeves (still have most of them) and there’s no way that clicking onto Youtube produces the same excitement, and neither does listening in front of the monitor. What has happened is that we have traded convenience for the experience.

Say what anyone will, a lot has truly been lost in the march forward, a lot that wasn’t dross but really a source of much personal pleasure.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on October 11, 2012, 07:38:43 AM
Oh dear, Bob Carlos Clake!  Another great.  And what a wit!  At the time that I was considering models to be excess walking protein, B C-C said that models were like ladybirds, simply a wood mite in a polka dot frock.

http://www.bobcarlosclarke.co.uk/slideshow.htm

But one of Donovan's later legacies for me were his videos for Robert Palmer (also departed the mortal coil).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrGw_cOgwa8&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcATvu5f9vE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d51FaknDwzA


Rob, I realise you probably loathe the on-axis lighting but it works for me.


Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on October 11, 2012, 10:08:32 AM
Oh dear, Bob Carlos Clake!  Another great.  And what a wit!  At the time that I was considering models to be excess walking protein, B C-C said that models were like ladybirds, simply a wood mite in a polka dot frock.

Rob, I realise you probably loathe the on-axis lighting but it works for me.


Ah, but the difference is that this snapper knew what he was doing!

It's interesting to look back at the videos and their times. There are those who will deride/criticise it all as woman-as-object; in my opinion, far from it.

If you look really carefully at those heads and bodies you don't see weakness, you don't see submission: you see the clearly expressed power and amusement in the faces of those ladies.. it's one of the greatly exciting features that some of the fair sex possess. That a majority may not is no good reason for it to deny those that do. I love them, and thank's for the links..

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on October 11, 2012, 03:27:17 PM
That a majority may not is no good reason for it to deny those that do. I love them, and thank's for the links..
Rob C

Rob,

I wonder if you agree that many who might deny do so as a knee-jerk reaction to a sense intimidation (or the usual guilt).

The term of the day, if you recall, was "Attitude".  It was something that, hitherto, had not been broadly encouraged as exemplified by terminology such as "the weaker sex" or "the little lady".

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on October 11, 2012, 06:22:48 PM
Rob,

I wonder if you agree that many who might deny do so as a knee-jerk reaction to a sense intimidation (or the usual guilt).

The term of the day, if you recall, was "Attitude".  It was something that, hitherto, had not been broadly encouraged as exemplified by terminology such as "the weaker sex" or "the little lady".



On the button!

However, I really think that only a majority of men ever believed in the idea of a weaker sex; I have always thought that women are all perfectly aware of their immense power, and it's only a matter of how/where they are brought up that allows them to be comfortable with it or, alternatively, to let it lie unharnessed. It's sometimes easier to submit and avoid situations.

On the matter of male fear of women, the intimidation you mentioned, that's illustrated so painfully right now with that poor kid shot in the head and neck by the guys in beards and turbans. What a perversion to use God as an excuse for one's own fears of inadequacy.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers: worth a look
Post by: kencameron on October 13, 2012, 03:28:49 AM
http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/11/collectively-photographing-fracking/
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: RobbieV on January 24, 2013, 01:03:50 PM
http://www.into-the-light.com/gallery/
Title: Re: Links to Photographers: worth a look
Post by: Rob C on January 24, 2013, 02:30:57 PM
http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/11/collectively-photographing-fracking/


Excellent set of pictures; puts me in mind of W. Eugene Smith's Pittsburgh adventure. It also shows how innocent rural groups appear to be and how far from the American Dream lots of lives really are. That's the same in most developed countries, of course: there are those that are at the front of the game who do very nicely, and the rest who struggle on to make ends meet, with little chance of any social mobility or even, I guess, self-help. I used to be totally conditioned to the theory of self-help, and believed that all it took in life was the will to win. Not so; living where I do, and finding myself truly stuck there unless willing to get out at a huge financial loss, I understand only too clearly what it means to be stuck in a bog. I'm lucky - so far - to be able to survive quite well; not so those with familes and no work. It's grim being poor and worse when you have heavy responsibilities beyond yourself.

It all seems so sadly familiar, somehow. The wheel of Life (Fortune?) in motion yet again.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 24, 2013, 02:43:55 PM
http://www.into-the-light.com/gallery/


Another great eye!

Says much, too, for LF and film. Yes, only jpegs, but they still have a look that's special.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 25, 2013, 02:59:15 PM
Think I posted this some couple of yeart ago; for benefit of newer guys or just film lovers:

http://www.pascalmeunier.com

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on January 25, 2013, 03:10:44 PM
Thanks for the Meunier link Rob.  It is s public holiday here and those pics have set the tone for me to go and eat Middle Eastern again today.

I just revel in the look of that film — my only pity is that it is colour.

Cheers,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 25, 2013, 03:20:38 PM
Thanks for the Meunier link Rob.  It is s public holiday here and those pics have set the tone for me to go and eat Middle Eastern again today.

I just revel in the look of that film — my only pity is that it is colour.

Cheers,

W


I eat Mallorquin today (I always do... unavoidable at 10 euros) at the old watering hole that had closed for six weeks over Christmas and reopened yesterday. The regular chef's off having cataracts dealt with; the owner's Mum was working the kitchen... maybe the regular chef needs a prolonged recuperation. Mum's pretty damned good! Enjoy your couscous.

Rob C

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 29, 2013, 04:26:54 PM
A contemporary:

http://www.michaelreinhardt.com

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on January 30, 2013, 06:28:17 AM
A contemporary:

http://www.michaelreinhardt.com

Rob C

The only shots on this site that left me (respectful, but) cold were the magazine covers/fashion shots, from which he presumably made his living. I found that puzzling, because I liked the others so much. I suppose they are fine examples of a genre that I fail to appreciate. On the other hand his "play" shots struck me as inventive and elegant.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 30, 2013, 09:29:54 AM
I guess it's down to eras and what was the fashionable look of those times.

What strikes me especially is the way that the then clean cover syle has given way to things that now look much like telephone directories or corner-retailers' fly-sheets: everything crammed and cramped together as if in some desperate shout with which to arrest the casual passer-by.

I have a suspicion that it's either a reflection of falling magazine sales or, more likely, those falls are the result of poor design actually putting erstwhile subscribers off. If you open those top mags today and inspect the inner pages you'd be amazed at how cramped everything is and at the plethora of tiny images, mostly too tiny to be of any real informative value. Yes, the main fashion 'stories' are still okay as regards the space pix are allowed, but apart from the full-page ads - it's a mess of too much information. IMO, I hasten to add.

But I do feel it's all gone the way of the toilet: the impossible, cultural fantasy of more for less reigns supreme.

Rob C

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: opgr on February 03, 2013, 04:23:04 PM
One for Slobodan:

http://www.navidbaraty.com (http://www.navidbaraty.com)
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Slobodan Blagojevic on February 03, 2013, 05:40:44 PM
Thanks. Yep, the guy is good. With a style. Especially liked the Blizzard/Rain series.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 03, 2013, 05:56:05 PM
Interesting work; I think those city streets are pretty cool!

Interiors: obviously not worried about PC lenses! Sometimes, converging verticals actually work better than pristine straights.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Patricia Sheley on February 03, 2013, 06:34:08 PM
Thanks. Especially liked the Blizzard/Rain series.
Yes, agreed...does the gent at the top of the snow steps count as street?
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 10, 2013, 04:02:44 AM
Just in case you like to listen whilst you toil, and making a change from swamp pop rock:

http://www.jazzradio.com

Rob C

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 27, 2013, 09:57:20 AM
Don't know if I posted this link before, but it's for Stan the Man.

http://www.modelpix.com/index2.html

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on February 27, 2013, 01:06:05 PM
Don't know if I posted this link before, but it's for Stan the Man.

http://www.modelpix.com/index2.html

Rob C

Thanks for the link Rob- another one for the favourites list..
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on April 10, 2013, 02:49:38 PM
Revisited an old favourite, Jeanloup Sieff's site; it's been updated with some different classics since the last time I looked. For anyone interested, there's a beautiful book with eponymous title published by Taschen: ISBN 3-8228-4647-3. I love it dearly.

http://www.jeanloupsieff.com

Rob C

P.S. The main  reason I looked again was because of something David Sutton mentioned about his own landscape shots with tiny figures. I remembered the book has quite a few such images, and one makes it over to the website, if not quite as tiny in the image as in some of the book shots.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on April 12, 2013, 03:39:06 PM
For those of you who remember the original Image Bank: this chap used to be a contributor...

http://www.grantfaint.com

And for the more romantically inclined:

http://www.giorgiomondolfo.com

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on April 16, 2013, 02:09:02 PM
I was given some old books ( from the early eighties) by a friend and was mesmerised by a photo of a woman in red high heels walking a set of stairs that I saw in one of them.

Luckily he has a website.

http://www.manfred-kriegelstein.de/
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on May 20, 2013, 04:36:48 PM
I think I posted this before with reference to a tv show that's shown here in his website.

However, I think something as valuable - if not more so - can be had from looking at the quality of film, especially with how it works with people shots.

http://www.duffyphotographer.com/

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on May 27, 2013, 04:14:14 PM
http://www.artkane.com/index.html

Check out his fashion gallery, and then have a look at some early Pirelli Calendars.

Oh dear; chickens or eggs?

A real master of the medium.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on May 27, 2013, 04:34:44 PM
There was a time I had his illustrated Beatles' lyrics but some excess walking protein nicked it donkey's ago.  By all accounts he became a very troubled sould and difficult but his images probably set a style for the time.

They've nearly all gone.  And when they have all gone there is nothing to replace them, let alone continue a tradition.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: petermfiore on May 27, 2013, 06:14:45 PM
I think I posted this before with reference to a tv show that's shown here in his website.

However, I think something as valuable - if not more so - can be had from looking at the quality of film, especially with how it works with people shots.

http://www.duffyphotographer.com/

Rob C

I feel his B&W is so much stronger, and beautiful. Thanks for the post. I enjoyed his work very much.

Peter
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on May 27, 2013, 06:48:46 PM
http://www.artkane.com/index.html
A real master of the medium.
Indeed, a real find for me. Interesting that he began as an art director, according to the atrociously written but still informative bio on the web site. The images all come with a clear and strong idea and he uses different photographic styles freely as they suit his purpose.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on May 28, 2013, 04:02:36 AM
There was a time I had his illustrated Beatles' lyrics but some excess walking protein nicked it donkey's ago.  By all accounts he became a very troubled sould and difficult but his images probably set a style for the time.

They've nearly all gone.  And when they have all gone there is nothing to replace them, let alone continue a tradition.


Walter, you have no idea how I mourn the passing of some of these people. It's as if part of my own life has been ripped out and throw into the bin. I respected so many of them, bought what I could afford or looked for their books in libraries (not with heaps of luck, mind you) and bought every magazine that I saw that had their name on the cover. Though I didn't, I felt that I knew them.

And no, there isn't anyone coming up behind.

The reason is, many contemporary guys are as good if not better, technically, but the originals set the idea standards and nothing has managed to replace those standards. Photoshopping isn't a valid advance on creativity and vision: that takes place at the camera. Photoshop is just another darkroom tool, not a way of thinking, a demonstration of personality.

It's as simple as that, for me.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on May 28, 2013, 06:54:01 PM
Rob,

I felt that we knew them because so much of what they did came from places so deep within rather than being the product of attempted emulation.

I also firmly believe that stopping to reload provided a punctuation point to the thought process  And forgetting digital for a moment,  I don't really think 'Auto-' anything helped all that either.  Auto-focus.  Auto-exposure.

Cheers,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on May 29, 2013, 11:12:11 AM
Rob,

I felt that we knew them because so much of what they did came from places so deep within rather than being the product of attempted emulation.

I also firmly believe that stopping to reload provided a punctuation point to the thought process  And forgetting digital for a moment,  I don't really think 'Auto-' anything helped all that either.  Auto-focus.  Auto-exposure.

Cheers,

W



Especially autofocus.

To me, part of the buzz with longer lenses is the almost tactile feeling of focussing by hand. Not only is it a thrill to see things pop in and out of focus, but it also forces you to think about which the best plane to focus upon might actually be: I have sometimes discovered that the accidentally found alternative offers a better image than did my original idea.

I also think that manual allows for a more 'focussed' way of thought, with less distraction.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on May 30, 2013, 12:31:08 PM
http://youtu.be/FZxFYeXPBmY

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on June 03, 2013, 08:24:15 PM
http://www.marklaita.net/home.html
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Gulag on June 04, 2013, 03:32:17 AM
http://www.erwinolaf.com/#/portfolio/

http://www.nadavkander.com/nadav_kander_main.html

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on June 06, 2013, 12:32:14 PM
Not exactly a link, but worth catching a glance if you can.

The BBC shows a Scandinavian crime series on Saturday nights called Arne Dahl.

I watch it, now and again, but sometimes it's just too clinically violent for my tastes and I pass. However, the point of mentioning it is this: some of the framing is amazingly good, especially when they shoot scenes or people through something like a window, props on a table, that sort of thing. Some of the best stills can be found in movies.

The show has English subtitles and they sometimes distract just at the best moments...

Does anyone know what Arne Dahl signifies? Is it somebody's name? I can't grasp any of the characters' names - might as well be Russians or Arabs for the connections I can make to anything or anyone. (How convenient were names like Mr Jones, Miss Smith, Mr Brown, Mrs Green.) Okay, I remember who slept with whom, but that's about it.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on June 09, 2013, 05:25:25 PM
http://youtu.be/S3eSMVsRqww

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on June 10, 2013, 12:47:52 AM
That was a super clip Rob, thanks.  And the one after it with Albert Watson was a cracker, too!

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Gulag on June 10, 2013, 01:02:31 AM
B&W: http://www.laurencedemaison.com/
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on June 10, 2013, 02:42:12 AM
Most intriguing Gulag, thanks.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on June 10, 2013, 05:35:22 AM
That was a super clip Rob, thanks.  And the one after it with Albert Watson was a cracker, too!

W


Didn't notice Albert was on there - thanks, I'l ltry again. He went, briefly, to the same Dundee art college as did my painter cousin and his son in turn.

Helena C. is one of those women that I would just love to photograph, regardless of how old she will become. I love her style of looks - no dumb blonde connotations whatsoever. I was a bit surprised at her list of 'heroes' but there you go, different times, different loyalty priorities.

It was funny to hear how Leica and 'blad have deserted the analogue snapper... could she be serious when saying that it should be her images that matter to those guys?

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: petermfiore on June 10, 2013, 07:56:39 AM


It was funny to hear how Leica and 'blad have deserted the analogue snapper... could she be serious when saying that it should be her images that matter to those guys?

Rob C

My exact thought.  Leica and 'blad and all the rest are in the moving product biz. Not the art biz. I was surprised at her surprise!

Peter
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on June 10, 2013, 03:24:41 PM
My exact thought.  Leica and 'blad and all the rest are in the moving product biz. Not the art biz. I was surprised at her surprise!

Peter


I'd guess that she was having a pop at them, knowing full-well where their interests always lay. Mind you, it would be interesting to know what would happen is she went digital, and neither do I know how old the video: she said her Leica was 25 years old... good news for Leica on the one hand, but also a reason why they might have chosen to go digital: more goes wrong and so more sales, especially to fanboys.

I clearly remember Leica catalogues for the M film cameras saying that rangefinder focussing with wide-angle lenses was much more accurate than with slr cameras; strange how these days one hears the opposite: rangfinder focussing isn't very good, and thus it's not a bright idea to shoot with wide open apertures... how things change in the telling!

I suspect that if Helena Christensen gave up her Pentax 67 and romanced Leica, they'd give her all the gear she asked for, and a fee, too. It was difficult, from the video, to know exactly whose pics were whose.

I saw some great shots of Helena, on Pentax 67, by Sante D'Orazio. In one magazine they looked like shutter bounce, but in another - I think his website - they seem crisp enough...

It's a wonderful world out there, I'm waiting to start again. My problem is, I've kind of lost my Tardis.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: petermfiore on June 10, 2013, 04:44:53 PM
Rob,

As far as Tardis goes, we here in Pa USA click our heels and are instantly transported in time to anywhere.
Just don't forget to grab your camera and off you go.


Peter
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on June 10, 2013, 04:48:14 PM
That was a super clip Rob, thanks.  And the one after it with Albert Watson was a cracker, too!

W

Hi Walter,

Found the rest of the videos in the series - I felt quite vindicated to hear Watson say that printing one's own work was pretty much essential, that the best 'printer' in the world would still not be the best printer for your pictures... only you have the insight to recognize what's right for the shot.

Amen. That's why the long, lonely nights spent in the darkroom, hands freezing from the wash, listening to pirate radio during the 60s...

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on June 12, 2013, 03:00:28 PM
http://youtu.be/aekSEfp9mlg

Go full-screen.

This I must try to find and to buy.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on June 12, 2013, 06:58:14 PM
I have several of AW's books and this appears to be a collection from many of them.

He was over here a few years ago to do the poster photography for a movie down in Melbourne.  It would have been nice had I been able to catch up with him.

Cheers,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on June 20, 2013, 02:57:08 PM
Love him or loathe him, you can't deny him!

Pretty much The Man?

http://www.artpartner.com/giovanni-testino-inc/

Rob C

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on June 22, 2013, 01:31:08 AM
It is a tough job to impress me but this lady has set my head swimming in a sea of wonder:

http://sarahsmall.com/

Enjoy,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on June 22, 2013, 04:25:45 AM
Walter, I chickened out.

I think life's grim enough already! I'm afraid I seek beauty and brighter, not more depression to add to the sack that I can bring along to the party as it is.

Frankly, either she or I have problems. I'd imagine, possibly both.

;-)

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on June 22, 2013, 06:46:58 AM
Different strokes,  I found the performance piece she did so reassuring and up lifting that I teared up.  Her stills are wonderful statements that speak on a multitude of levels.

But I respect that we cannot all read the same things into imagery.  maybe it is that ambiguity that some people frequently speak of.

Cheers,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: louoates on June 22, 2013, 10:25:37 AM
Walter, I chickened out.

I think life's grim enough already! I'm afraid I seek beauty and brighter, not more depression to add to the sack that I can bring along to the party as it is.

Frankly, either she or I have problems. I'd imagine, possibly both.

;-)

Rob C

Me too.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on July 01, 2013, 01:40:18 PM
I was paging through an encyclopedia on photography last night and noted they had a bit on South African photographers. Roger's small town series I found interesting.

http://www.rogerballen.com/

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: paulferdinae on July 17, 2013, 08:49:04 PM

Hey so I just bought this spectacular framed print from Brian Arnold and I thought I would share with you that all the money from the sales of his work goes directly to the Kelowna Gospel Mission so why not helping our fellow canadians in BC and getting a beautiful landscape photo?

I bought the print from http://brianarnoldimaging.deviantart.com/
 but if you are more interested in the stock photo file than the framed print you can also buy it from his site: http://www.brianarnoldimaging.com

I can tell you he is not keeping a cent from the sales since he started this campaign back in January. In case you don't know about the Mission:

Kelowna's Gospel Mission provides comprehensive counselling, employment and independence training, and affordable transitional housing to end homelessness.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on July 18, 2013, 03:36:26 PM
Paul, this thread isn't about selling anything to anyone here.

It's about listing interesting photographic sites. Period.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 02, 2013, 10:08:51 AM
Loved this woman since I first discovered her work back in the late 60s or early 70s.

http://www.galloismontbrunfabiani.fr/photographer/sarah-moon/portfolio-i/

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 21, 2013, 03:06:23 PM
Why have we all forgotten about him?

http://www.loustettner.com

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 21, 2013, 05:00:15 PM
A link to multiple photographers. (http://www.nytimes.com/projects/2013/lens-my-hometown/?best_200=true&page=1) Mostly documentary, with maybe an occasional hint of street.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: kencameron on September 21, 2013, 05:04:38 PM
Why have we all forgotten about him?

http://www.loustettner.com

Rob C

Interesting. Restrained and classical photographs, paintings and sculptures with neither of those qualities.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on September 22, 2013, 04:21:24 AM
A link to multiple photographers. (http://www.nytimes.com/projects/2013/lens-my-hometown/?best_200=true&page=1) Mostly documentary, with maybe an occasional hint of street.


Thanks for the link; I think it goes some way to illustrating the argument about native talent.

Of course, not knowing any of the kids, there's no way to know if the pix are one-off hits, or consistent work. In any case, some show remarkable eye, and the fact of their youth suggests that they have not had time yet to be messed about with by gurus. Many shots would have made me very happy to have authored them. I suppose what youth might bring is a lack of awareness of being misunderstood by the people being photographed. Yes, it seems they are mainly pix of friends. but I believe that the approach (and reception) might probably be the same on the 'street' of strangers. A youngster with a camera is not the same kid with a baseball bat and a hood.

A good link, and thanks again.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on November 17, 2013, 02:56:37 PM
Just to prove that one does not have to be type-cast forever.

I remember this chap from his fashion days - great eye for colour and apparently never lost it, either. Enjoy the excellent black/whites as well.

http://www.chris-simpson.com/

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on November 17, 2013, 04:50:48 PM
Nice work Rob,

I have seen him before.  The video is interesting but reinforces my firmly held belief that photographers should not be allowed to speak — particularly about themselves.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on November 18, 2013, 04:39:42 PM
Nice work Rob,

I have seen him before.  The video is interesting but reinforces my firmly held belief that photographers should not be allowed to speak — particularly about themselves.




Mostly accurate observation, but I did enjoy the Bailey/Duffy exchange in the Duffy video to be found on his (Duffy's) site. I think Duffy conducted himself quite well in the body of the Duffy video, considering he knew he was on his way out, poor chap.

I think you already have the link - if not, I can post it again.

I have never been able to find Bailey's site - maybe he's too grand to have one, or being of the same generation as moi, he doesn't give a shit anymore. I do give a shit, but then only because I'm not rich.

What can one do? It's too late.

No, it's not: I haved a share in the El Gordo X'mas lottery, along with the rest of the restaurant where I eat; I'd hate to be the odd pauper left. I also manage to finance the Euromilliones thing to the tune of €4 a week (two bites at the cherry - Tuesdays and Fridays). It's worth it for the excitement alone: better than beta-blockers and aspirins to keep the heart thumping along.

I hope one day to make mine a rich family.

;-)

Rob C

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on December 25, 2013, 01:39:44 PM
http://www.panascape.co.za/wppana/index.php/galleries/landscapes-2/

South African photgraphers, does some interesting stuff in Cape Town.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 02, 2014, 05:17:37 PM
Hi Riaan,

Here's another from the early days, whose work is so good. And it's all to do with basic photography and not just heaps of fakery:

http://www.arthurelgort.com/

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 11, 2014, 02:23:27 PM
http://www.bertsternmadman.com/

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on January 12, 2014, 01:29:04 AM
Has anyone linked to Norman Parkinson yet? Just discovered him a couple of weeks ago, and discovered this thread today! Thanks for sharing!

www.normanparkinson.com/ (http://www.normanparkinson.com/)
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 12, 2014, 04:31:34 AM
Parks was well, well established long before I arrived on my local scene; he was a sort of step between the former homosexual snappers and the more girl-chasing lot that followed. (I would have belonged to the latter, both chronologically and by nature, but had a wonderful wife already... however, as they say, no harm in reading the menu even if you are on a strict diet.) The BBC made a good documentary about him a while back, and his featured beach shots of Iman, Bowie's femme, rate amongst the most beautiful fashion shots ever.

Somehow, and again this is another personal take, Parks did have the great fortune of being around in the right place and at the very best of times. Both old enough to have enjoyed wartime success and still young and talented enough to have made it through the visual and cultural earthquakes of the 60s and onwards to new highs of his own, an Edinburgh Pirelli  included. I suppose that going on assignment to Edinburgh must have felt just like going on another thrilling location shoot for him; when you've been to all the exotic isles already, why not a historical jaunt, just for the change? At least, he would have discovered that kilts are an embarrassing myth, a joke reserved for weddings, shooting/fishing lodges, tourist shops and carnivals.

Both he and Avedon inspire me for one great and personal reason: they both died in the saddle. That's an ambition I would hope to fulfill, too, even if now possible only in amateur status.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 15, 2014, 04:26:14 PM
http://www.albertwatson.net/

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on January 15, 2014, 04:34:57 PM
I am a great fan of 'Cyclops' Watson.  His vision is powerful right across the board of subject matter.  I have a number of his monographs and I think my favourite might be Marroc.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on January 15, 2014, 10:46:37 PM
... they both died in the saddle. That's an ambition I would hope to fulfill, too, even if now possible only in amateur status.

Rob C

Rob, I understand what you're saying, but 'an ambition to die in the saddle' - isn't that a morbid thought? An ambition to photograph is 'normal', death will happen nevertheless.

Personally, I'd hate to die on a job - I hate unfinished work, not meeting deadlines and disappointing clients. It's not like there's any valor involved, as in Sparta = "come back with your camera, or on it".
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 16, 2014, 09:15:04 AM
Rob, I understand what you're saying, but 'an ambition to die in the saddle' - isn't that a morbid thought? An ambition to photograph is 'normal', death will happen nevertheless.

Personally, I'd hate to die on a job - I hate unfinished work, not meeting deadlines and disappointing clients. It's not like there's any valor involved, as in Sparta = "come back with your camera, or on it".



Nope, no valor, but sure beats the stuffing out of lying dead in an old-folks home with wet bedsheets and crumbs on one's beard. Of course, if the wet bed sheets and asphyxiation came from an excellent joke, that's another matter.

This is just an ordinary joke:

Judge: when did you realise you'd been raped?

Whore: when the cheque bounced.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 16, 2014, 03:50:46 PM
I am a great fan of 'Cyclops' Watson.  His vision is powerful right across the board of subject matter.  I have a number of his monographs and I think my favourite might be Marroc.




As an aside, Walter - I had quite forgotten just how wonderful Watson is; his range is pretty immense and he seems able to do it all in great style. In fact, in the Beauty section, towards the end, there are two shots aping Marilyn à la Dienes - and possibly Peter Gowland - complete with polka-dotted brolly! Takes guts (and a certain humility with it) for someone as famous as our Albert not to feel too 'big' to refer to another photographer's style and icons!

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 17, 2014, 03:59:26 PM
http://anthonylukephotography.blogspot.co.uk/2012/03/photographer-nadav-kander-discusses-his.html


Interesting interview, especially near the end when he compares working with film and then going the digital route.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 18, 2014, 04:55:53 PM
http://www.chicobialas.com/


Another island dweller.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 19, 2014, 05:33:48 AM
Interesting video..


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJ820Fcu20I

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 23, 2014, 05:27:16 AM
For those who dabble in portraits...

http://www.felixlammers.com/


Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Slobodan Blagojevic on January 23, 2014, 10:00:14 AM
Do not worry, Keith, in case of such a confrontation, there are plenty more of us who would circle our wagons to protect Rob, should he ever be in need of such protection.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 23, 2014, 12:12:00 PM
Of which Dick Dastardlies do we speak?

The bandana that gets most usage is the red one; well, it's now red on the inside but very pale pink on the outer. It can't be reversed, i.e. worn inside out, because worn that way, the thing just won't lie down following the contours of my head. Like with those woollen hats that are otherwise fantastic protection against the wind down from the Alps, both items of apparel climb upward to the top of my head, and in the case of the woollen one, lend me the appearance of a pixie or garden gnome, neither of which match the svelte looks of the Nikon. Obviously, that has to be a no-no. The other bandana, the traditional navy with paisley pattern border, never sat properly, so it's worn only for housework.

Regarding the infarctus topic: it was little fun lying in bed, either time! And no, I wasn't 'on the job' as the saying goes, I was asleep and then awake. Fortunately.

"As an aside, you can bet if there's a confrontation here on LuLa that RobC will be in the middle of it. What exactly is it about you or your posts here that attracts so much strife? Is it something you seek or enjoy? Is it like this for you in the real world?"

Where does that come from? What have I missed? Dammit, everything passes right over my head - must be that bloody bandana! But Keith, isn't this the real world?

Heart attack No.3 felt very close half-an-hour ago. I had shot a cellpic at lunch, which I shall post here, and when I connected up the mobile, it wouldn't transfer to Samsung's Kies software that I'd installed in W8! I reinstalled and reinstalled and now have given up. So, back to the  XP computer, and from there I have the shot on the external drive and can slot it in here. Microsoft has no idea the amount of sheer hatred that flows its way from Mallorca. This very W8 topic arose at a bar straight after lunch - a further case of hatred, but this time from a US citizen here. On the other hand, hatred unites people; the haters, that is.

Slobodan, I hope your wagon can continue its travels in peace, with no flaming arrows marking its pristine canvas!

;-)

Rob C

P.S. In all the excitement of covered wagons, I forgot to say that the pic illustrates what's decor in the eatery that I found open today.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 23, 2014, 02:18:50 PM
Rob, the time to worry is when it's the only world ;-)

Thank God for that! I have a fantasy one too.

;-)

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 27, 2014, 01:01:05 PM
Revisited an old favourite just now:

http://www.charliewaite.com/home

Never a landscape shooter myself - drew the line with some dabbles in so-called 'atmospherics' for stock - I did enjoy reading/looking at his books when I found them in libraries during return trips to Ecosse. I'm certain he had this pact with the horned one; my own French trips never revealed anything remotely like his.

The site is different to the way I remember it - the images still pretty seminal and another good reason to moan about lost 'blads.

Enjoy, you countryside mavericks!

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on January 30, 2014, 01:50:16 PM
Hard - impossible? - to beat today.

http://www.vogue.co.uk/spy/celebrity-photos/2012/01/23/jean-shrimpton-style-file/gallery/720833

For me, it proves eye and subject is so much more vital than a zillion pixels and the world's greatest Photoshop artist. Sad that we appear to have lost faith in the humanity of pictures and only look for the pinpricks where we touch the thing, the number of lights that was used, how well they reflect off the dehumanized, plastic transformation we have created...

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on January 30, 2014, 04:49:57 PM
Aaaah, Rob,

Thems was the days!

In Australia there is a saying that the ideal woman is a beauty queen that owns a pub.

Such was the case with the Shrimp — had a boozer on the Cornish coast for years I believe.

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Riaan van Wyk on January 31, 2014, 12:26:57 AM
Aaaah, Rob,
Thems was the days!
In Australia there is a saying that the ideal woman is a beauty queen that owns a pub.
Such was the case with the Shrimp — had a boozer on the Cornish coast for years I believe.
W

Thank you for the link Rob. Lovely stuff.

Walter, in South Africa we prefer them to have a 4x4 and boat too. If it's a diesel Land Cruiser all the better.  
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 04, 2014, 02:50:12 PM
I think this is a better link:

http://www.pbase.com/belyaevsky/sarah_moon

Rob C

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on February 04, 2014, 03:54:55 PM
What a gem.  Thanks Rob.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 04, 2014, 05:33:02 PM
I look at her work and see what I see, and then I think about today's priorities and arguments (see the thread about the Leica MF camera) and, for me, those modern problems all sink away into another world of concerns not in any way related with the greater concept.

Moon could work with a Brownie (probably has!) and produce something spectacular. In the end, it isn't about cameras, formats or anything mechanical - it's all about emotion and thinking and feeling. That's why a style that, on the face of it, could be so easily copied, seldom is.

In the Barry Lategan site there's a shot on the wall of two heads - at first I thought they were Moon's work - I'm still not sure if they are, or are actually meant to be his work - it's worth the detective work just to see the similarity, and then to wonder...

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on February 04, 2014, 06:27:32 PM
Where is the Lategan link?
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 05, 2014, 04:27:13 AM
Where is the Lategan link?


I have it on the non-W8 computer; I'll look it up and pass it along as soon as I can. Got it. Actually, three heads, not two in the shot.

http://barrylategan.com/barry_lategan_documentary.html

Time: 0.03; 7.14; 7.35; 8.07; 8.40 are where the influences show strongly.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 06, 2014, 12:45:30 PM
Classic. So what's better today?

http://pleasurephoto.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/photo-brian-duffy-french-elle-1978-lindinspensable.jpg

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 10, 2014, 09:46:07 AM
I've linked to him before, but though he's no longer with us, his daughter keeps the site revolving.

http://jeanloupsieff.com/#

I particularly like the current selection; the landscapes, though not his main commercial oeuvre, are interesting and I love the starkness, the bleakness of view. Such a change from the usual saccharine ideas of this century.

Rob C

P.S. Would you believe it? Two minutes later and it's changed!
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on February 12, 2014, 05:42:25 AM
Thanks for posting all the links, I've finally managed to go through it all. Here's a link to a Nick Knight interview (I confess I don't know who he is), posted on The Online Photographer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOBZMS9Bhr0

In it, he makes the argument that goes like this:


And then one goes to his site to see his theory in action...

I admit I've never understood fashion - an art form always restricted to the glamor of it all - purports to worshiping the cloth but isn't it actually ogling at the human body instead; always fitting the slim and beautiful folk while ignoring the majority of humanity (writing this while looking at Sebastiao Salgado's cover of Sahel: http://www.masters-of-photography.com/images/full/salgado/salgado_covers.jpg)?

Is it the only popular art form that totally avoids tragedy? What am I missing?
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on February 12, 2014, 05:47:01 AM
Really loved Art Kane's stuff. Here's a link to the photographer via whose work I came to discover LuLa:

http://whitecube.com/artists/gregory_crewdson/
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 12, 2014, 11:55:47 AM
Thanks for posting all the links, I've finally managed to go through it all. Here's a link to a Nick Knight interview (I confess I don't know who he is), posted on The Online Photographer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOBZMS9Bhr0

In it, he makes the argument that goes like this:

  • Fashion is about clothes
  • Clothes 'move'
  • Therefore, video is better suited to the aesthetics of fashion

And then one goes to his site to see his theory in action...

I admit I've never understood fashion - an art form always restricted to the glamor of it all - purports to worshiping the cloth but isn't it actually ogling at the human body instead; always fitting the slim and beautiful folk while ignoring the majority of humanity (writing this while looking at Sebastiao Salgado's cover of Sahel: http://www.masters-of-photography.com/images/full/salgado/salgado_covers.jpg)?

Is it the only popular art form that totally avoids tragedy? What am I missing?



Nick Knight made his name as a fashion photographer many years ago; worked with all the top international girls of the time. I suppose he probably does more film than stills today - so his take is politically understandable. I visited his site a couple of times but found it somewhat overpowering...

I never felt that fashion had much to do with body, as in the human. If you want body look no further than jeans and T-shirts. All the shows and glitz are about making designer names well-known by catching press attention, which is why so many see-through dresses appear. Do you ever see them in reality? I never did, outwith a shoot, and still don't, unless moderated by copious volumes of underwear baffles!  But the money they make no longer seems to come from haute couture at all, but their prêt-à-porter stuff available in the city stores, where all the accountants' and dentists' wives can afford to buy into their level and version of the zillionaire dream. And then don't forget: the makeup and perfumery side of the same companies turns over vast fortunes.

Long Tall Sally girls are chosen for photography of fashion for the simple reason that people photograph fatter and shorter than they appear in reality. Cloths hang better on shop mannequins; tall thin girls come the next closest. No maker imagines that their market is the model figure; they all know the reality of life and who would know it better than those who have to decide how many thousands to make in which sizes or face bankruptcy... Morals? That teenagers might starve themselves to look like imaginary models is basically their problem, not that of anybody else. In a world where overweight girls appear to be the norm anywhere one looks, a little less eating and guzzling of soft drinks and hamburgers may be no bad thing. Please don't mention 'meals in a bucket', accepting which marketing philosophy must be the defining level of low self-esteem. But then, blaming somebody else for our own shortcomings is such a convenient cop-out.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on February 13, 2014, 04:07:32 AM
...But the money they make no longer seems to come from haute couture at all, but their prêt-à-porter stuff available in the city stores, where all the accountants' and dentists' wives can afford to buy into their level and version of the zillionaire dream.

My wife and I were watching The Devil Wears Prada last night on TV, and I looked up Anna Wintour, editor of Vogue (on whom the movie was based) since 1988 (25 years+!!). Her target group: "high-flying businesswoman" who likes to "put together something quickly" (source: Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Wintour).

I totally understand the business side, and I was wrong about my assumption. It seems their focus is on the body, but business is obviously their primary concern. The more fat people, the better thinner girls sell.

I don't understand if it is art in the sense 'copywriting and advertising is art', or in the sense 'sales is an art'. When I look at Art Kane's and Parks' work, I feel they always had something more going on that nobody else knew about.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 13, 2014, 03:04:45 PM
I've just lost myself an entire reply by twice-clicking somewhere by mistake.

In it's place (and à propos of nothing in the lost piece), since I can't redo it, I'll just quote this from Art Kane:

"I need an assignment, I love an assignment. I love discipline. Discipline creates freedom."

Rob C

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: petermfiore on February 13, 2014, 03:48:10 PM
Rob,
Truer words have never been spoken.....


Peter
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 14, 2014, 08:50:20 AM
Rob,
Truer words have never been spoken.....


Peter


Innit the troof! That was my worst nightmare vis-à-vis stock: motivation in a shrinking market.

I lost. So did the game.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 15, 2014, 03:46:03 PM
I remember him well; great man of his times and much appreciated, too.

http://www.michaelreinhardt.com/

Rob C

P.S. Even something for Russ here... ;-)
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on February 17, 2014, 05:09:12 AM
I've just lost myself an entire reply by twice-clicking somewhere by mistake.

In it's place (and à propos of nothing in the lost piece), since I can't redo it, I'll just quote this from Art Kane:

"I need an assignment, I love an assignment. I love discipline. Discipline creates freedom."

Rob C


I gave it a few days, but I don't get the meaning. I understand 'discipline creates freedom', and totally agree, but I don't get the context.

This guy is phenomenally talented: http://www.joeyl.com/favor-galleries/quick-selection/ And he's only 25, give or take. Maybe it's his age, but he's the only photographer whose website has a gear page.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 17, 2014, 09:26:52 AM
I'd never heard of this guy, but I'm glad I found these two videos (Pt 1 and Pt 2).

http://www.americansuburbx.com/2013/12/emmet-edith.html

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 17, 2014, 09:35:11 AM
I gave it a few days, but I don't get the meaning. I understand 'discipline creates freedom', and totally agree, but I don't get the context.

This guy is phenomenally talented: http://www.joeyl.com/favor-galleries/quick-selection/ And he's only 25, give or take. Maybe it's his age, but he's the only photographer whose website has a gear page.



It's a part of the same thing as the 'infamous' Donovan quotation about pro/am motivational difficulties. Assignment enforces discipline and, by definition, assignment brings concentrated effort in a real, defined direction, thus removing the stupor of not having anything 'important' to do with the camera, leading to indecision and fundamental lack of purpose. The problem, basically, is that when there is no pressing reason to photograph something, then there simply is no reason to photograph it.

And once you are aware of this in life, it takes a lot to continue along a pointless path. Possibly a fine example of ignorance being bliss.

I enjoyed your link - nice to see somebody today not over-lighting everything!

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on February 17, 2014, 12:24:03 PM
I'd never heard of this guy, but I'm glad I found these two videos (Pt 1 and Pt 2).Rob C

I am bloody glad you found them also, Rob,

I have been something of a fan of Emmet Gowin for several years and so the videos formed a nutritious treat for my own wellbeing.

That second clip is jammed full of quotable quotes.  It is barely 4 in the morning now and I'll have to return and do some transcription at a more human hour.

Many thanks,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on February 17, 2014, 12:37:36 PM
And yet more fruit of my insomnia.  A clip from 31 years ago:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-LAOJcBw2s

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on February 17, 2014, 12:40:20 PM
Have you seen this one Rob?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RSknnxOals

and/or

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zh-zGgRMOXk
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 17, 2014, 01:53:36 PM
Thanks, Walter, even if it makes me feel I've said so very little in my own photographìc life.

The thing about much of Moon is that she worked magic well before Photoshop existed. I marvel at her distressed images look - almost as much as I do at the fashion editors who were happy to accept her viewpoint and not scream for every stitch to show. But then maybe that's exactly why she got the work: her personality. What a lesson on how to employ a photographer for all those minor ADs who want to call all the shots!

Listening to the soundtrack of the first one I hear echoes of a previous interview she had with Frank Horvat - it's in his site and I'm sure you saw it too, long, long ago. It's her mind, the way it understands the moments of searching common to most of us who have stood there, camera in hand, with a woman in front of us and wondered exactly what the hell we were going to do with her next. The nervous excitement and almost the relishing of the fear of emptiness, the belief that something, anything will turn up and it'll work out if only because we know it will because we believe that it will, and that it certainly won't if we don't have the inner strength to keep the faith alive even through the dead moments, of which there are usually many between the moments of eureka!

I wonder if I would still be blessed with belief today.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 17, 2014, 02:27:09 PM
On lighter note:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUvDYW9-6RA

First time I've seen a guy who made it look like fun - for both sides of the equation. Or is that reaction inspired because of the presence of the filming camera?

What's the little camera? A Sony or a Fuji of sorts? Looks very easy to use. Answered my own question by seeing the first few seconds again: Fuji.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on February 17, 2014, 05:37:53 PM
Rob,

The camera is the Fuji with the permanently grafted on 35mm lens with optical as well as EVF viewing.

I sort of see what you saw in him although I hold the genre in such disdain that I could only watch a minute or two to see your point.

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on February 19, 2014, 04:28:30 AM

It's a part of the same thing as the 'infamous' Donovan quotation about pro/am motivational difficulties. Assignment enforces discipline and, by definition, assignment brings concentrated effort in a real, defined direction, thus removing the stupor of not having anything 'important' to do with the camera, leading to indecision and fundamental lack of purpose. The problem, basically, is that when there is no pressing reason to photograph something, then there simply is no reason to photograph it.

And once you are aware of this in life, it takes a lot to continue along a pointless path. Possibly a fine example of ignorance being bliss.

I enjoyed your link - nice to see somebody today not over-lighting everything!

Rob C

Thank you for the explanation! Unfortunately, it was exactly as I feared, but...never mind...another time perhaps.

These links are taking up most of my lunch breaks, and is infinitely more worthwhile than reading about lines per mm. Good art doesn't need explanations or justifications; like a hundred dollar bill on the road. Thank you!

PS. Saul Leiter. Blown away by his 'street' work.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 19, 2014, 04:55:35 AM
Thank you for the explanation! Unfortunately, it was exactly as I feared, but...never mind...another time perhaps.

These links are taking up most of my lunch breaks, and is infinitely more worthwhile than reading about lines per mm. Good art doesn't need explanations or justifications; like a hundred dollar bill on the road. Thank you!

PS. Saul Leiter. Blown away by his 'street' work.



Sareesh,

Was a time I would buy photography magazines just for the very release to which you refer.

I now find so much additional information online about people of whom my earlier knowledge was limited to the magazines that I'd actually read. It's amazing to realise, just from concentrating on a few old favourites, how much about them was unknown to me until the possibilities of the Internet.

I was always very interested in reading about other photographers who'd impress me with their pictures; it's one thing appreciating the work, but another thing altogether discovering how their minds work/worked. I suppose that because I know just how much dedication it took to stay in the business, I find the minds of these other people so fascinating and their stories so rewarding. It's not really much to do with fanboyism - though I do admire the pix - rather is it an interest in trying to understand their motivation and route to being who they became. In the end, people are what really matter the most in art, the machinations of the marketplace something quite else and probably beyond them themselves. That disillusion might creep in with too much knowledge is a risk I'm prepared to take!

The withdrawal symptoms that a dead Internet might provoke are horrific to contemplate.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 20, 2014, 04:17:20 PM
For those who loved LP covers - even bought the damned things just for their covers:

http://www.wschupfer.com/photographers/anton-corbijn/album-covers

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on February 21, 2014, 08:30:07 AM
Sareesh,

Was a time I would buy photography magazines just for the very release to which you refer.

I now find so much additional information online about people of whom my earlier knowledge was limited to the magazines that I'd actually read. It's amazing to realise, just from concentrating on a few old favourites, how much about them was unknown to me until the possibilities of the Internet.

I was always very interested in reading about other photographers who'd impress me with their pictures; it's one thing appreciating the work, but another thing altogether discovering how their minds work/worked. I suppose that because I know just how much dedication it took to stay in the business, I find the minds of these other people so fascinating and their stories so rewarding. It's not really much to do with fanboyism - though I do admire the pix - rather is it an interest in trying to understand their motivation and route to being who they became. In the end, people are what really matter the most in art, the machinations of the marketplace something quite else and probably beyond them themselves. That disillusion might creep in with to much knowledge is a risk I'm prepared to take!

Absolutely. Just saw 'In no great hurry' - a documentary about Saul Leiter in his studio, essentially a storage of disorganized memories. You look at all the great vertical images he shot (he still shoots vertical, with a Panasonic Lumix I believe - doesn't get any more modest than that), and then he says something like: I've got a thing for raindrops on windows. You don't find things like that in a camera manual.

What I learn from these videos (all made possible because of the Internet) is how things are done. It's priceless.

Quote

The withdrawal symptoms that a dead Internet might provoke are horrific to contemplate.

Rob C

It only took about 100,000 years after man climbed down from the trees, so we can now climb up back again and live our entire lives on the Internet.

On a serious note: In my unimportant opinion, a dead Internet would be the lowest point in the history of mankind. It's not because of the free flow of information blah blah, it's because man has a history of creating borders and making things difficult. It's amazing how this was allowed to happen.

Back to photographers, to complement my previous link, I link to another travel photographer who shoots with a Canon DSLR and strobe, and whose $12 ebook I bought: http://www.mitchellkphotos.com/

Two different ways to make travel photography - same technique - camera + one soft box. One uses modest DSLRs and a small Photoflex, the other uses a P65+ with Prophoto and Elinchrom gear. They both look happy.

Quote
For those who loved LP covers - even bought the damned things just for their covers:

http://www.wschupfer.com/photographers/anton-corbijn/album-covers

Thanks for this one! Big fan of REM, and now I know who shot the cover.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 21, 2014, 12:29:30 PM
http://photographyinterviews.blogspot.com.es/2009/04/saul-leiter-quiet-iconoclast-saul.html

A favourite quotation from Saul Leiter, 22//!2009:

"I realise that the search for beauty is not highly popular these days. Agony, misery and wretchedness, now those are worth perusing."

http://www.gallery51.com/index.php?navigatieid=9&fotograafid=15

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Justinr on February 21, 2014, 02:35:46 PM
I gave it a few days, but I don't get the meaning. I understand 'discipline creates freedom', and totally agree, but I don't get the context.

This guy is phenomenally talented: http://www.joeyl.com/favor-galleries/quick-selection/ And he's only 25, give or take. Maybe it's his age, but he's the only photographer whose website has a gear page.


Stunning work indeed, thanks for passing it on.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 22, 2014, 04:48:26 AM
http://www.artistandagency.com/artist/gilles-bensimon/bio

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Justinr on February 22, 2014, 05:05:10 AM
I gave it a few days, but I don't get the meaning. I understand 'discipline creates freedom', and totally agree, but I don't get the context.

This guy is phenomenally talented: http://www.joeyl.com/favor-galleries/quick-selection/ And he's only 25, give or take. Maybe it's his age, but he's the only photographer whose website has a gear page.


Thinking on from this I do wonder whether that is because the actual make of kit he uses is secondary to the post processing he lavishes with great skill upon the images, but then, other than a photo of a Phase One he doesn't give too much away.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on February 22, 2014, 11:53:50 PM
Thinking on from this I do wonder whether that is because the actual make of kit he uses is secondary to the post processing he lavishes with great skill upon the images, but then, other than a photo of a Phase One he doesn't give too much away.

I don't know. I'm one of those people who has a peculiar eye condition that allows me to see 'the medium format look'. Compare his travel photos with those of Michael's (link in above post) - the camera techniques and post processing is the same - ND filter, f/2.8, single strobe+soft box, reflector and some dodging and burning.

Whenever I see a MFDB image with humans in it, the image just pops out for some strange reason. Joey knows how to market himself. He uses the bigger P65+ sensor, a bigger flash unit that can overpower the sun, travels with two guys and records videos of his 'trials and tribulations' - all powerful stuff.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 24, 2014, 04:53:05 PM
Bert Stern's Finest Hour +:

http://vimeo.com/35807953

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 25, 2014, 02:42:50 PM
Did anyone realise that Mario Casilli had died quite few years ago?

Saddens me...

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on February 25, 2014, 06:04:58 PM
Did anyone realise that Mario Casilli had died quite few years ago?

Saddens me...

Rob C


Mario Cassilli. Photographer Born on 22.01. 1931 in Cleveland, Ohio Died on 25.04.2002 in Los Angeles

And Bert Sterns finest hour was actually an hour and twenty one minutes.  Thanks for the link — great to see and hear it again.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on February 25, 2014, 06:06:59 PM
And on a similar tragis note:  Pompeo Posar (February 21, 1921 – April 5, 2004)
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 26, 2014, 04:16:37 AM

Mario Cassilli. Photographer Born on 22.01. 1931 in Cleveland, Ohio Died on 25.04.2002 in Los Angeles

And Bert Sterns finest hour was actually an hour and twenty one minutes.  Thanks for the link — great to see and hear it again.


I thought you might enjoy it - I sat through it a total of six times when it was new, at the old Cosmo in Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. As with La Dolce Vita, I dragged several other guys to see it too a couple of times, and I think most enjoyed it. It left a mark on Stoney Keef too: he went to see it many times just to catch the clip with Chuck Berry. For me, with a foot in both camps (as fan) I was distressed to see the cold way with which the rest of those musos, with the exception of drums and clarinet, treated Berry. One could sense the bitterness and financial envy, not to mention musical snobbery at play. However, unless the audience reactions were rigged in production in some way, Berry got the most wild round of applause of all of the performers other than perhaps the two gospel girls.

The opening sequences with the ripples of water were ahead of their time: the beginnings of music videos, no less, before videos existed.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 26, 2014, 04:20:40 AM
And on a similar tragis note:  Pompeo Posar (February 21, 1921 – April 5, 2004)


Oh shit! And he was head photographer there for years. I was going to look for him tonight on the web... I suppose I still will, but in a sad way.

As bad, I once found a link to a list of ex-Playmates, and it was hellish to see how many had died from breast cancer. What God giveth...

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 26, 2014, 04:07:08 PM
For Sareesh: it doesn't get better than this - never did!

https://www.google.es/search?q=hans+feurer&tbm=isch&imgil=Fc_zEWVNc3rx6M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcTK6jZcRbUqvQvTXdrR0qxiaomFaXZf-Daw45sXuTygYjtkq0qF%253B744%253B496%253BFn8xrvMYW7KOeM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.benjaminkanarekblog.com%25252F2011%25252F04%25252F16%25252Femmanuelle-alt-hans-feurer-vogue-paris%25252F&source=iu&usg=__1Ddr_ZhcMsnmBxCdUCYgUODRmF8%3D&sa=X&ei=VFUOU8KIBsOSywOww4K4AQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC8Q9QEwAA&biw=1257&bih=886#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=hDWKvnOJa4IXgM%253A%3BWGmuj-9zzDPUpM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252F1.bp.blogspot.com%252F-OFf__64ggb8%252FUdLQbwMbhrI%252FAAAAAAAAiYE%252FueILku2zL3A%252Fs1361%252Fmode3_newslicious_hans_feurer_antidote.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fmode.newslicious.net%252F2013%252F07%252Fstreet-style-catherine-frida-zuzanna.html%3B1361%3B908

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on February 28, 2014, 03:31:42 AM
For Sareesh: it doesn't get better than this - never did!

https://www.google.es/search?q=hans+feurer&tbm=isch&imgil=Fc_zEWVNc3rx6M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcTK6jZcRbUqvQvTXdrR0qxiaomFaXZf-Daw45sXuTygYjtkq0qF%253B744%253B496%253BFn8xrvMYW7KOeM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.benjaminkanarekblog.com%25252F2011%25252F04%25252F16%25252Femmanuelle-alt-hans-feurer-vogue-paris%25252F&source=iu&usg=__1Ddr_ZhcMsnmBxCdUCYgUODRmF8%3D&sa=X&ei=VFUOU8KIBsOSywOww4K4AQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC8Q9QEwAA&biw=1257&bih=886#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=hDWKvnOJa4IXgM%253A%3BWGmuj-9zzDPUpM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252F1.bp.blogspot.com%252F-OFf__64ggb8%252FUdLQbwMbhrI%252FAAAAAAAAiYE%252FueILku2zL3A%252Fs1361%252Fmode3_newslicious_hans_feurer_antidote.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fmode.newslicious.net%252F2013%252F07%252Fstreet-style-catherine-frida-zuzanna.html%3B1361%3B908

Rob C


Wow! That man knows (knew?) how to light a face. But what really struck me is his sense of location and fashion - he made those clothes actually belong somewhere other than a rack. Thanks for sharing, I'm going to dig deeper.

By the way, that link you posted must truly be a Guinness Record! I'm a geek so I'll point out the numerous sub-links hidden in that main link - like a fingerprint. Links, the future milestones of history.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 28, 2014, 04:04:30 AM
Wow! That man knows (knew?) how to light a face. But what really struck me is his sense of location and fashion - he made those clothes actually belong somewhere other than a rack. Thanks for sharing, I'm going to dig deeper.

By the way, that link you posted must truly be a Guinness Record! I'm a geek so I'll point out the numerous sub-links hidden in that main link - like a fingerprint. Links, the future milestones of history.


No, Hans Feurer, is still very active!

I'm glad you enjoyed the link - makes the act of passing it along worth the effort.

http://www.demarchelier.net/home.html

This is a link to a Frenchman in New York (that sings more like a movie, that an appellation!) who has known more than his share of great images and related success.

Oddly, or perhaps not really oddly at all, his Pirelli left me more than disappointed; it's a calendar that seems to have brought out the best and also the worst in different photographers: some rise to the occasion where others seem to get mired down in doubt - or perhaps too much external direction/pressures?

Rob C


Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 28, 2014, 03:20:32 PM
The best I could find from a prompt from a friend:

http://vimeo.com/76377099

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on February 28, 2014, 03:47:50 PM
Another link I've posted back in the day, but the interesting thing - apart from exemplary images - lies in the fact that the photographer has both film and, now, digital Leica history.

You'll probably enjoy this stuff - I certainly did, then and now.

http://www.pascalmeunier.com/portfolio_en.php

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on March 01, 2014, 07:08:02 AM

No, Hans Feurer, is still very active!

I'm glad you enjoyed the link - makes the act of passing it along worth the effort.

Absolutely worth the time. There are already five 'gems' I've found in the last few weeks that I didn't know existed before. Definitely inspiring.

Quote

http://www.demarchelier.net/home.html

This is a link to a Frenchman in New York (that sings more like a movie, that an appellation!) who has known more than his share of great images and related success.

Oddly, or perhaps not really oddly at all, his Pirelli left me more than disappointed; it's a calendar that seems to have brought out the best and also the worst in different photographers: some rise to the occasion where others seem to get mired down in doubt - or perhaps too much external direction/pressures?

Rob C

This guy (Is he in the VIP section of the who's who of the upper echelons of the fashion photography world?), amazing as his work is, leaves me cold. It struck me as the same as nice 'money-earning' wedding photography, but with better models, locations and an art director to play with. But what a career.

Let me put it this way: He's got the best models and actresses on his site, and I don't want to go back to revisit his photographs. Whoever his audience is, it's not me; though I'm sure my wife could spend a couple of hours admiring the Louis Vuitton bags strewn on the side-walk.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on March 01, 2014, 07:17:08 AM
The best I could find from a prompt from a friend:

http://vimeo.com/76377099

Rob C

Simply brilliant! My fifth gem.

"Blumenfeld referred to art directors as a*se directors..."
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on March 01, 2014, 07:24:04 AM
Another link I've posted back in the day, but the interesting thing - apart from exemplary images - lies in the fact that the photographer has both film and, now, digital Leica history.

You'll probably enjoy this stuff - I certainly did, then and now.

http://www.pascalmeunier.com/portfolio_en.php

Rob C

My least favorite! Maybe it's because some of the places he's photographed are those I have intimate knowledge of, and they look like snapshots anybody can take with an iphone - and then bump up the saturation in Photoshop. I'll stop here because I don't want to spoil it for the others.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 01, 2014, 09:59:07 AM
I'm wondering about the contrast; as much of the material is old and from film, I wonder if it's actually the effect of the inability to expose for shadows without killing highlights?

In an article about another 'hero', Pete Turner,

http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/Video-Library/video/Professional-Imaging/Pete-Turner-Empowered-by-Color/950747299001

Turner mentions the way he used to copy original transparencies several times, a process which inevitably bumps up contrast; I wonder if being a PJ, this other guy had to do much the same (copy) in order to distribute his material to different agencies... who knows.

Demarchelier. Très VIP! He was put on a multi-million dollar contract with American Vogue - probably an inclusive for all Condé Nast titles - several years ago; I think of him as very elegant, especially in black/white, whereas Feurer I see as a great camera stylist - stylist in a way that I love. Could I be either, photographically speaking, I think I'd like to be Feurer.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on March 04, 2014, 04:29:32 AM
I'm wondering about the contrast; as much of the material is old and from film, I wonder if it's actually the effect of the inability to expose for shadows without killing highlights?

In an article about another 'hero', Pete Turner,

http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/Video-Library/video/Professional-Imaging/Pete-Turner-Empowered-by-Color/950747299001

Turner mentions the way he used to copy original transparencies several times, a process which inevitably bumps up contrast; I wonder if being a PJ, this other guy had to do much the same (copy) in order to distribute his material to different agencies... who knows.


Beautiful use of color. Some terrific shots of Africa...and everything else. Official gallery (http://www.peteturner.com/).

Here's one I found, contemporary to Stieglitz: http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?artistFilterInitial=&criteria=O%3AAD%3AE%3A6338&page_number=1&template_id=SS&sort_order=1

From Wikipedia:
Quote
White's photographs were not casually posed; he carefully controlled every detail in his scenes, sometimes even having special costumes created for his models.

Like they say, there's nothing new under the sun.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 04, 2014, 05:13:58 AM

Here's one I found, contemporary to Stieglitz: http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?artistFilterInitial=&criteria=O%3AAD%3AE%3A6338&page_number=1&template_id=SS&sort_order=1

From Wikipedia:
Like they say, there's nothing new under the sun.



Not only that, but looking at his work, the only thing I didn't like was the hideous tonality/colour. But then I have never been a fan of old processes where I don't think they have improved anything; it's my beef with those chaps who try this stuff today: in my view, they just create ugliness where they might equally have produced beauty. It seems perverse.

Take that away, and those images show me more than I had ever suspected: the roots of our present day senses of photographic style and composition are even more grounded in the past than I had previously thought it to be the case.

His work, printed well today in a traditional darkroom, would be wonderful to behold.

Thank you for this link; I really do appreciate this interchange of information rendered possible via LuLa.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 04, 2014, 10:38:29 AM
Another 'eat your heart out' experience:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=3U7bnIYcvRM

Rob C


P.S.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wTjaDOLAeiQ

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on March 05, 2014, 05:46:31 AM
Another Seth Effricen, they are in the news here at present too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvWAjhgjg-k

Cheers,

W
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 05, 2014, 12:26:17 PM
Another Seth Effricen, they are in the news here at present too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvWAjhgjg-k

Cheers,

W




Thank you, Walter; this segment of LuLa is becoming one of the most valuable of them all for me. Thanks again.

I didn't know anything about this guy prior to your link; it's quite sobering seeing how much environment has to do with whom you meet and where that might carry you. I was always aware of it to a degree, but it's only when one considers how it works for other people that the broader reality of it comes home, and one stops thinking of it as just how similar events may have impacted on one's own life, or even how the lack of such events could have been very negative factors in the outcome. In other words, one starts to understand that nobody does it on their own: there are always those important others who open doors of provide the means towards an objective.

Again: si jeunesse savait et vieillesse pouvait.

If youth but knew and age but could. ( Translation for non-Canadians and/or non-Scots. ;-) )

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on March 06, 2014, 01:11:46 AM
This man was possibly the greatest of all influences on my early life:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xfz5m6Oj2z8

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 06, 2014, 04:41:55 AM
This man was possibly the greatest of all influences on my early life:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xfz5m6Oj2z8




I've reverted to getting up at eight rather than at nine in order that I may do more stuff before lunch; that more stuff has metamorphosed into watching more videos than ever before, so in practical terms, a mixed blessing! I found the sound on this one very difficult (his voice) and then I remembered I had a pair of ears to hook up, so clutching them hard to my head I reran the thing and caught pretty much all he had to say.

Again, the manner of his introduction as a non-photographer to photography, in Paris Vogue, no less, beggars belief and reminds me of what I'd commented on earlier about how chance and other people can affect the way our lives turn out to be. If anything, it reinforces my conviction in some destiny, quite beyond any of us, calling the shots.

Thanks again,

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: mikeyam on March 07, 2014, 12:15:09 PM

It's a part of the same thing as the 'infamous' Donovan quotation about pro/am motivational difficulties. Assignment enforces discipline and, by definition, assignment brings concentrated effort in a real, defined direction, thus removing the stupor of not having anything 'important' to do with the camera, leading to indecision and fundamental lack of purpose. The problem, basically, is that when there is no pressing reason to photograph something, then there simply is no reason to photograph it.

And once you are aware of this in life, it takes a lot to continue along a pointless path. Possibly a fine example of ignorance being bliss.

I enjoyed your link - nice to see somebody today not over-lighting everything!

Rob C

Thanks for sharing this, Rob. Any chance you could explain this idea further or point me in the direction of the original quote? I can really relate to the idea of lacking purpose, because I often don't shoot without a clear purpose (or I can't determine what that purpose is) and am certainly missing out on opportunities as a result.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 07, 2014, 04:41:04 PM
Thanks for sharing this, Rob. Any chance you could explain this idea further or point me in the direction of the original quote? I can really relate to the idea of lacking purpose, because I often don't shoot without a clear purpose (or I can't determine what that purpose is) and am certainly missing out on opportunities as a result.


Hi Mike,

To paraphrase it as well as I can remember it: " the problem for an amateur is finding a reason to make a photograph," his implication being that a pro has commercial assignments that give him both purpose and direction, whereas an amateur, without such pressures, has nothing to drive him other than the feeling that he really should be doing something with all that stuff he's bought, but what?

As a retired pro I share the concern, and it's damned difficult to overcome it and find something truly worth the effort involved. And it's worse with digital because of all the awful time spent sitting in front of a goddam monitor and computer, with your legs going numb and messing up your circulation, something for which you pay when you get old.

If I can find the source - which I think I can - I'll post it for you here.

Rob C


http://www.photoquotes.com/showquotes.aspx?id=57&name=Donovan,Terence

I've seen it elsewhere, slightly different wording, and also heard him say it in an interview online.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on March 07, 2014, 05:25:32 PM
Well Rob, for me this quote which I found on your link is even more axiomatic:

The magic of photography is metaphysical. What you see in the photograph isn't what you saw at the time. The real skill of photography is organized visual lying. - Terence Donovan - Guardian (London, 19 Nov. 1983)

Then, of course, there is the espoused wisdom of my grand deity atop my pantheon:

How relevant is this quote to this place?

The first half of the 20th century belongs to Picasso and the second half is about photography. They said digital would kill photography because everyone can do it but they said that about the box brownie in 1885 when it came out. It makes photography interesting because everyone thinks they can take a picture. - David Bailey

and,

It takes a lot of imagination to be a good photographer. You need less imagination to be a painter, because you can invent things. But in photography everything is so ordinary; it takes a lot of looking before you learn to see the ordinary. - David Bailey - In "Face," (London), Dec 1984.

and lastly for now,

I never cared for fashion much, amusing little seams and witty little pleats: it was the girls I liked. - David Bailey - In "Independent." (London), 5 Nov. 1990.

Of course, for me, one of Bailey's quirkiest quotes was at the end of his series on models where he is interviewing Isabella Rosselini in a warehouse full of mannequins and declares to her:  "This my idea of hell, being surronded by pussy and none of it works!"

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: mikeyam on March 07, 2014, 10:00:28 PM
Well Rob, for me this quote which I found on your link is even more axiomatic:

The magic of photography is metaphysical. What you see in the photograph isn't what you saw at the time. The real skill of photography is organized visual lying. - Terence Donovan - Guardian (London, 19 Nov. 1983)

Then, of course, there is the espoused wisdom of my grand deity atop my pantheon:

How relevant is this quote to this place?

The first half of the 20th century belongs to Picasso and the second half is about photography. They said digital would kill photography because everyone can do it but they said that about the box brownie in 1885 when it came out. It makes photography interesting because everyone thinks they can take a picture. - David Bailey

and,

It takes a lot of imagination to be a good photographer. You need less imagination to be a painter, because you can invent things. But in photography everything is so ordinary; it takes a lot of looking before you learn to see the ordinary. - David Bailey - In "Face," (London), Dec 1984.

and lastly for now,

I never cared for fashion much, amusing little seams and witty little pleats: it was the girls I liked. - David Bailey - In "Independent." (London), 5 Nov. 1990.

Of course, for me, one of Bailey's quirkiest quotes was at the end of his series on models where he is interviewing Isabella Rosselini in a warehouse full of mannequins and declares to her:  "This my idea of hell, being surronded by pussy and none of it works!"



Thanks again Rob. My problem is that I'm a pro who has assignments, but they're all the wrong ones. I need to figure out how to make the transition to the right ones!
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 08, 2014, 09:55:33 AM
Thanks again Rob. My problem is that I'm a pro who has assignments, but they're all the wrong ones. I need to figure out how to make the transition to the right ones!



For too long I faced that too. The answer depends on your circumstances: are you living where the work you want exist, and if not, are you free to go to the work?

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 08, 2014, 10:02:13 AM
These two are mainly for you, Walter, because you will be well familiar with both.

https://www.google.es/search?q=wingate+paine&tbm=isch&imgil=G1wVHKqENSiQ7M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcSx1ZrRyULxxxPStxTDMgPmhSY-ZHY4HKyJqA0dt38Yo7bREOKX0Q%253B546%253B700%253BbDxTYTXcL2Qk5M%253Bhttps%25253A%25252F%25252Friochico.wordpress.com%25252F2014%25252F02%25252F06%25252Fwingate-paine%25252F&source=iu&usg=__Ak3RU3IMQDc1ssJ5aGYT6S4-M50%3D&sa=X&ei=iSgbU8rMOomv7AbP04DwCw&sqi=2&ved=0CDMQ9QEwAg&biw=1257&bih=886#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=G1wVHKqENSiQ7M%253A%3BbDxTYTXcL2Qk5M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Friochico.files.wordpress.com%252F2014%252F02%252Fwingate-paine11.jpg%3Bhttps%253A%252F%252Friochico.wordpress.com%252F2014%252F02%252F06%252Fwingate-paine%252F%3B546%3B700

http://www.samhaskinsblog.com/?tag=wingate-paine

In the first link, one has to be careful: not all of the images belong to Wingate Paine.

What I will say is this: both photographers were blessed with incredible muses.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on March 10, 2014, 04:36:13 PM
Rob,

I am small 'C' catholic enough to be curious to see most things.  At the time I was not so impressed by Wingate Paine, but with the passage of time I am more open to his work.

Similarly, I have not been a fan of Annie L pretty much since she split with Rolling Stone but I found this 1993 Melvyn Bragg doco about her which provides fascinating and frank insights.

She and I shared a London agent in the 80s and he told me some very impressive tales of her business acumen and integrity.

Have a look for yourself if you haven't see it before:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2lbAN-_0A0

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 10, 2014, 06:22:18 PM
Rob,

I am small 'C' catholic enough to be curious to see most things.  At the time I was not so impressed by Wingate Paine, but with the passage of time I am more open to his work.

Similarly, I have not been a fan of Annie L pretty much since she split with Rolling Stone but I found this 1993 Melvyn Bragg doco about her which provides fascinating and frank insights.

She and I shared a London agent in the 80s and he told me some very impressive tales of her business acumen and integrity.

Have a look for yourself if you haven't see it before:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2lbAN-_0A0




Thank you for the link, Walter; I hadn't seen that one. I do have the BBC one (Arena, I think) called Life through a Lens or something like that. It's a docu that included part of the making of her book that covers 1990 - 2005. She's an interesting character, to say the least.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 12, 2014, 02:02:50 PM
https://www.google.es/search?q=edouard+boubat&client=firefox-a&hs=Ai9&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=np&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fZ8gU4TUKaWd0wXav4GIDA&ved=0CJwBEIke&biw=1266&bih=863



Perhaps not generally as well-known as his brothers-in-arms, but just as talented in his genre.

Rob C


And no less:

https://www.google.es/search?q=sabine+weiss&client=firefox-a&hs=Udp&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=np&tbm=isch&imgil=FtzhIbSNIuVglM%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcTmaTPHBlAsrTgVtu06PWUpoPmM6FWBgKpVIOxX2lidnKLwjv6K%253B1200%253B779%253BDfol--mzSaaJFM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fonlinebrowsing.blogspot.com%25252F2011%25252F11%25252Fsabine-weiss-photography-gave-me.html&source=iu&usg=__D_k5QTTRfvM32coukCKqpeWULRQ%3D&sa=X&ei=W6ggU4uYD7Gc0wWClID4Cw&ved=0CCwQ9QEwAA#facrc=_&imgrc=FtzhIbSNIuVglM%253A%3BDfol--mzSaaJFM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252F3.bp.blogspot.com%252F-e47uDya-dWY%252FTsVANXXAXtI%252FAAAAAAAAc8U%252Fd9b_ih3y8cg%252Fs1600%252Fsabine-weiss-aegypten-1983-sabine-weiss.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fonlinebrowsing.blogspot.com%252F2011%252F11%252Fsabine-weiss-photography-gave-me.html%3B1200%3B779
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Sareesh Sudhakaran on March 13, 2014, 05:31:53 AM
https://www.google.es/search?q=edouard+boubat&client=firefox-a&hs=Ai9&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=np&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fZ8gU4TUKaWd0wXav4GIDA&ved=0CJwBEIke&biw=1266&bih=863



Perhaps not generally as well-known as his brothers-in-arms, but just as talented in his genre.

Rob C


And no less:

https://www.google.es/search?q=sabine+weiss&client=firefox-a&hs=Udp&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=np&tbm=isch&imgil=FtzhIbSNIuVglM%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcTmaTPHBlAsrTgVtu06PWUpoPmM6FWBgKpVIOxX2lidnKLwjv6K%253B1200%253B779%253BDfol--mzSaaJFM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fonlinebrowsing.blogspot.com%25252F2011%25252F11%25252Fsabine-weiss-photography-gave-me.html&source=iu&usg=__D_k5QTTRfvM32coukCKqpeWULRQ%3D&sa=X&ei=W6ggU4uYD7Gc0wWClID4Cw&ved=0CCwQ9QEwAA#facrc=_&imgrc=FtzhIbSNIuVglM%253A%3BDfol--mzSaaJFM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252F3.bp.blogspot.com%252F-e47uDya-dWY%252FTsVANXXAXtI%252FAAAAAAAAc8U%252Fd9b_ih3y8cg%252Fs1600%252Fsabine-weiss-aegypten-1983-sabine-weiss.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fonlinebrowsing.blogspot.com%252F2011%252F11%252Fsabine-weiss-photography-gave-me.html%3B1200%3B779

Lovely black and white images, especially from Edouard Boubat...almost haunting.

I found a video that I don't know whether to 'approve' or to 'decry': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UM2HRhh4Wg

I don't want to spoil it, so all I'll say is it's a Phase One video of a fine-art fashion photographer.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 13, 2014, 05:50:11 AM
Here's another guy I remember from Vogue...

Also a lover of reflex lenses, though he seems to have less of that on show here.

http://www.eddykohli.com/

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 13, 2014, 06:01:13 AM
Lovely black and white images, especially from Edouard Boubat...almost haunting.

I found a video that I don't know whether to 'approve' or to 'decry': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UM2HRhh4Wg

I don't want to spoil it, so all I'll say is it's a Phase One video of a fine-art fashion photographer.


In my time, he'd have been stoned. To death.

Or he'd have been celebrated and fêted and put upon a pedestal. Then he'd have been stoned. That's what the press does.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on March 13, 2014, 06:54:35 AM
Lovely black and white images, especially from Edouard Boubat...almost haunting.

I found a video that I don't know whether to 'approve' or to 'decry': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UM2HRhh4Wg

I don't want to spoil it, so all I'll say is it's a Phase One video of a fine-art fashion photographer.

That Hun makes a strong case in favour of chemical castration.  All those experiments with genetic engineering and his genes still swam the gauntlet.

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 13, 2014, 11:39:26 AM
That Hun makes a strong case in favour of chemical castration.  All those experiments with genetic engineering and his genes still swam the gauntlet.




There's little natural justice in this world, Walter.

;-)

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 13, 2014, 05:52:24 PM
http://www.peterlindbergh.com/essay/

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on March 13, 2014, 06:01:58 PM
A powerfully sage proclamation there Rob.
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Justinr on March 13, 2014, 07:44:28 PM

In my time, he'd have been stoned. To death.

Or he'd have been celebrated and fêted and put upon a pedestal. Then he'd have been stoned. That's what the press does.

Rob C

Reminds of a quote of Barry Norman's -

A man will put a women on a pedestal the better to look up her skirt.

The press does a lot of that as well.

(I think it was him anyway)
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: WalterEG on March 13, 2014, 10:59:47 PM
I wonder if you have seen this, Rob?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JwFKukEUiY&index=15&list=FLzoBqtz6eGcJLghP9htkVtQ

Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 14, 2014, 11:07:03 AM
I wonder if you have seen this, Rob?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JwFKukEUiY&index=15&list=FLzoBqtz6eGcJLghP9htkVtQ



Hi, no, I hadn't see it before, Walter. Thank you for the links, I enjoy seeing these things.

I had seen a pic or two of Bailey in bed with him, but knew it was supposedly in order to get the interview, but hadn't seen the interview as such.

Having seen it, now, I can't say I'm sorry to have missed being in the 'group' there - a bunch of sad guys 'n' gals, by the look of it. However, it probably does speak volumes about the  perceived values of some folks at some periods in recent history, and I can quite see how the gallerista thing might have spawned and developed in a haze of dope, poofery and pretensions. To think those people has mothers... well, we did see one of them, so maybe one shouldn't be too surprised. But then again, why would you kill a laying, golden goose?

;-)

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 14, 2014, 01:23:56 PM
http://youtu.be/G8UIR6k-iXk


Well worth watching - some good advice early on.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 15, 2014, 02:36:43 PM
http://photographyinterviews.blogspot.com.es/search?updated-min=2012-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&updated-max=2013-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&max-results=6

Some interesting interviews if you can winkle them out of the site; seems a bit awkward to find them.

Rob C
Title: Re: Links to Photographers
Post by: Rob C on March 16, 2014, 05:57:16 PM
Since professional photographers are now consigned to the dustbin by LuLa's majority readership, I suppose there's no point giving links to any more of them.

I guess you'll all find photo-heaven in twitter or whatever the hell it is grabs your fancy.

Adios.